The Attachment Parenting Book: A Commonsense Guide to



10 thoughts on “The Attachment Parenting Book: A Commonsense Guide to Understanding and Nurturing Your Baby

  1. Amy Amy says:

    In our family, this is the definitive parenting book Rather than extolling the virtues of being a wire monkey Mama, and getting your newborn infant to adapt to your busy life, Dr Sears gently shows that it s OK to listen to your parenting instincts Hold your babybreastfeed your babysleep with your babyand by all means, pick your baby up when she cries In a culture that prizes independence beyond just about all else, Dr Sears presents evidence that the mainstream parenting practic In our family, this is the definitive parenting book Rather than extolling the virtues of being a wire monkey Mama, and getting your newborn infant to adapt to your busy life, Dr Sears gently shows that it s OK to listen to your parenting instincts Hold your babybreastfeed your babysleep with your babyand by all means, pick your baby up when she cries In a culture that prizes independence beyond just about all else, Dr Sears presents evidence that the mainstream parenting practices produce the exact opposite fearful and detached children, who lack compassion and trust Attachment Pareting, however, is all about cultivating the Parent Child bond, engendering trust, and nurturing a young human being with respect and love.If you are a parent, or you plan to be, take a week or so to read this book, and see if it speaks to you Your child will be the better for it


  2. Kat Kennedy Kat Kennedy says:

    I had high expectations for this book.Mostly, because without a lot of information and preparation, I d likely be a pretty shit parent It was either read a buttload of books and hope for the best or let the TV do the job for me image error I m still not sure I made the right choiceI want to make it clear that if there is a particular parenting philosophy that I give favouritism to much like I do to the child that annoys me the least it would be Attachment Parenting It is the child rearin I had high expectations for this book.Mostly, because without a lot of information and preparation, I d likely be a pretty shit parent It was either read a buttload of books and hope for the best or let the TV do the job for me image error I m still not sure I made the right choiceI want to make it clear that if there is a particular parenting philosophy that I give favouritism to much like I do to the child that annoys me the least it would be Attachment Parenting It is the child rearing philosophy that I most emulate and use The reason I m disappointed in this book is because it makes a lot of promises that it backs up with almost no research Perhaps there wasn t that much research supporting Attachment Parenting in 2001 but there must have been some because you almost trip over all the studies and research supporting attachment parenting now.I also dislike any parenting method promising your child will grow up better smartersuccessful etc Look, you can breastfeed, baby led wean, co sleep, babywear, elimination communication, etc all you like But all this will do is mean that you have a breastfed baby that eats whatever it can fit in its mouth when it s not sleeping in your bed and attached to your body and letting you know through various methods of cooing that it s about to pee down your front It s not a promise that your child is going to be a doctor That doesn t mean all that stuff isn t great except for the elimination communication shit I m just nowhere near that dedicated as a parent but it s not a predictor for future success.The book is really dumbed down and thus painful to read as most of it is basically answering question after question It s not until the very back of the book that they outline particulars of Attachment Parenting and I don t think they do it rather well.Over all, if you want to read into Attachment Parenting then maybe try a different bookOr, alternatively, care less about your parenting image error The experts assure me that a little childhood trauma builds characteror maybe that was Ed, Edd and Eddy It s hard to remember this stuff in between neglecting my son and leveling my Warlock.


  3. Leslie Leslie says:

    Beware of Baby Trainers as a foundational building block of your philosophy I think Sears takes it too far when he refers to all other parenting styles as detached He is misguided at best arrogant at his worst.I agree that emotionally bonding and attaching with my child is important, but not with the underlying premise that a child was emotionally traumatized at birth and needs to be near to parents 24 7 to receive this attachment I also find it laughable that Sears spends 80% of t Beware of Baby Trainers as a foundational building block of your philosophy I think Sears takes it too far when he refers to all other parenting styles as detached He is misguided at best arrogant at his worst.I agree that emotionally bonding and attaching with my child is important, but not with the underlying premise that a child was emotionally traumatized at birth and needs to be near to parents 24 7 to receive this attachment I also find it laughable that Sears spends 80% of the book defending the child centered AP style, calling on Almighty Science every parenting book does too, Sears often demonizing all others, namely baby trainers A side note on Sears psychological arguement I think the danger of using pop psychology as a basis for parenting is that it is like philosophy it s man made, and it tends to lean humanistic I agree with the fundamental definition and application of the attachment theory Bowly , but I think it s quite dangerous to assert psychoanalysis over what is communicated in the Scriptures and what occurs naturally in my experience.I ve never considered myself a baby trainer, like he so antagonistically characterizes anyone who has let their baby cry or lovingly used routine or a schedule to bring order to her child s sleep and eating habits, but according to Dr Sears I am a BT and I m dead wrong and detached He would call me well meaning, but wrong Awful folks like me treat their children like pets according to Dr Sears pg 119.I obviously disagree I created a routine, am happy I did, and I am still learning how to respond to my son It seems to me that our bonding has been successful alongside training him in the way he should go Proverbs 22 6 Dr Sears would say that baby knows best pg 127, and others , but I would argue that sometimes babies perceive a need that is not legitimate and it is okay at an early age to meet it in the appropriate way the need to wait vs be near, hunger vs sleepiness, etc Dr Sears would agree with this, but it s subtle and I feel like he goes back and forth This book was helpful, but not complete I suggest someone interested in parenting styles not buy into one book or one doctor psychologist s way of seeing the parent child relationship Instead, especially for the Christian parent, that they seek the wise counsel of the Scriptures, apply their own values convictions, and then supplement with various techniques And honestly, I don t think Sears psychologically flawed and child centered approach is the best one out there Read this book and Babywise Heaven forbid I even mention that one Don t approach the nursing relationship without reason and wisdom Dr Marc Weissbluth s Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child is also a great companion book that speaksto the importance of the baby s sleep habits Get balanced information and then rest in your own convictions, what you come to do naturally, who your child is and what he needs, and what your partner agrees to do with you May Christ and honoring Him i.e the Gospel be the center of your home, not you, and not even that dear baby


  4. Ann Ann says:

    My two star rating doesn t reflect my opinion of attachment parenting, it reflects how I responded to the book overall Even though my family practices many aspects of attachment parenting I felt as though the tone of the book was too preachy and made too many assumptions about parents who don t practice attachment parenting I also felt many of the statements and beliefs weren t adequately backed up by research and seemed over simplified Blessed with a high needs baby just wear them in a sli My two star rating doesn t reflect my opinion of attachment parenting, it reflects how I responded to the book overall Even though my family practices many aspects of attachment parenting I felt as though the tone of the book was too preachy and made too many assumptions about parents who don t practice attachment parenting I also felt many of the statements and beliefs weren t adequately backed up by research and seemed over simplified Blessed with a high needs baby just wear them in a sling most of the day and nurse all night while bed sharing but be sure to find a balance between parenting and your own happiness I m glad I read this mostly so I could better understand others who follow the Sears family but I m glad I didn t read it before giving birth to my 11 mo son Instead I will continue to read other sources on attachment


  5. Marie Marie says:

    This book is very commonsense as the subtitle suggests but also different than what I thought I knew I like what it has to say.When I read A Lantern in Her Hand it talks about Abbie s daughter in law who raises her children by the book, and is so strict about it that she will let no one else help This is in contrast to Abbie, who had almost no mentor, but knew what to do for her children After reading that I knew didn t want to raise my children by the book I want to do what I feel is This book is very commonsense as the subtitle suggests but also different than what I thought I knew I like what it has to say.When I read A Lantern in Her Hand it talks about Abbie s daughter in law who raises her children by the book, and is so strict about it that she will let no one else help This is in contrast to Abbie, who had almost no mentor, but knew what to do for her children After reading that I knew didn t want to raise my children by the book I want to do what I feel is best, and not what someone who doesn t know them says But the paradox is that this book feels like it is bringing us back to the roots of just knowing what to do It talks about trusting our instincts, and doing what would be natural if there were no outside cultural norms My favorite thought is that our job is to get to know, and take care of our children, and we do that by being with them I ve really enjoyed talking to my mom and mother in law about this book, but I ve also learned that, unless I want to argue, there are quite a few people I should not bring the concepts up around


  6. Merewyn Merewyn says:

    When my daughter was about 2 months old she stopped sleeping in her crib One morning after a horrible night of neither of us sleeping, I bundled her up and walked to my mom s place My mom took one look at us and told us to go sleep in the spare room As tired as I was, I was terrified of co sleeping but my mom promised to check in on us every few minutes to make sure I didn t roll over onto her We slept that way the entire day and when we awoke my mom said I hadn t moved at all except for twi When my daughter was about 2 months old she stopped sleeping in her crib One morning after a horrible night of neither of us sleeping, I bundled her up and walked to my mom s place My mom took one look at us and told us to go sleep in the spare room As tired as I was, I was terrified of co sleeping but my mom promised to check in on us every few minutes to make sure I didn t roll over onto her We slept that way the entire day and when we awoke my mom said I hadn t moved at all except for twice when I nursed her something I only vaguely remember doing The next night I tried again to put her in her crib and when she refused I immediately gave up and moved her into my bed She hasn t gone back into the crib since and I love sharing a bed with her I sleep better, she sleeps better and every morning I wake up to happy baby smiles Then I starting researching co sleeping indepth and that was when I first heard of Dr Sears and the term attachment parenting Reading this book has made me realize that I am an AP and that I can trust that the decisions I make for my baby will be the right ones, regardless of how others choose to parent And even though there is a lot in the book relating to the two parent family, I like how it also does touch on single APs like me Dr Sears gives parents confidence to be the best parents they can be as well as to accept that there is no such thing as a perfect parent


  7. Anita NotherBook Anita NotherBook says:

    I liked this book, but not as much as I thought I would I followed a lot of attachment parenting principles with my first son, without even knowing it was called that I just did what made sense and came instinctively to me It made me feel better and easier for us to work on his struggling nursing issues to have him close to me at night than to put him all alone in a separate room It was easier to wear him and have my hands free than carry him all around or deal with bringing a stroller eve I liked this book, but not as much as I thought I would I followed a lot of attachment parenting principles with my first son, without even knowing it was called that I just did what made sense and came instinctively to me It made me feel better and easier for us to work on his struggling nursing issues to have him close to me at night than to put him all alone in a separate room It was easier to wear him and have my hands free than carry him all around or deal with bringing a stroller everywhere.According to Dr Sears, there are seven B s of Attachment Parenting many of which are stretches of the use of the letter B Birth bonding, Breastfeeding, Babywearing, Bedding close to bayb, Belief in the language of the baby s care, Beware of Baby Trainers, and Balance meeting adults s needs as well as children s needs Once I realized that I had practiced attachment parenting to a large extent, I was expecting my second child, and I wanted to make sure I was doing it all right the second time around I also wanted to read advice about how to transition in attachment parenting from the newborn first year of life stage to the toddler becoming an older child stage of life The best thing I got out of the book was Beware of Baby Trainers I like to call this trust your own instinct With my older son, I felt a little bombarded by well meaning people often strangers Or other moms I had just met who would ask me questions such as Is he sleeping through the night , How is breastfeeding coming along , or give me advice such as, It s fine to supplement with formula and you re insane for insisting on breastmilk only even from gross sources like donated milk from other moms to keep pumping forever because breast is best , or You ll spoil him if you pick him up every time he cries, or Get him on a sleep schedule even if you have to let him cry it out, or He ll die of SIDS if you let him sleep in bed with you I always second guessed my decisions and felt somehow inadequate But then my son matured from a needy, confusing yet usually content newborn into a seemingly well adjusted infant and then a typical hit or miss toddler I realized I was doing just fine Everyone has their own opinions and parenting style, and I should just trust my own But it wasn t until I read this book that I really understood the importance of going with my gut So that was helpful But I was left with the question of how to transition I have to say that this book has almost ZERO answers for parents of babies kids beyond 6 to 12 months old Or perhaps the answer is to just keep attachment parenting them But I wanted to know what happens when they misbehave and need a bit of discipline which, to me, just means guidance and direction What happens when they hate daycare When they refuse to eat in a high chair There s a big difference between attending to a newborn s every need and learning to let a child explore limits but also teach and guide them.This book is definitely for parents of young babies and I m hoping to find some kind of sequel for the toddler years In the meantime, I ll just keep trusting my gut I believe in some strange sort of hybrid between attachment parenting and free range parenting I definitely believe in giving my kids independence and self autonomy but also good guidance and direction, and those things are outside the scope of this book, so I m trying to figure them out for myself.The basic advice this book gives is really good, and I do believe that babies benefit from all of the B s of attachment parenting As a basic introduction and explanation into the concepts of attachment parenting and why parents might want to try it out, it s a good book But I had two other problems with it First, the Balance part didn t sound very balanced to me I think this book is aimed towards stay at home moms or at least moms who stay at home with their babies for the first 6 to 12 months of life and a lot of its advice is impractical for moms who need or want to return to work I feel fortunate to be able to mostly stay home with my sons while they re young and to have a lot of help from my husband and his family I didn t have my kids until I was in my mid 30 s with an established career and a lot of savings in the bank, so I m able to significantly cut back on work for awhile in order to focus on them But many moms aren t in the same situation, voluntarily or involuntarily, and so the advice seems rather unrealistic or maybe even a bit judgmental For instance, after a lengthy section that talks about childcare, Dr Sears says he s assuming that only parents or other family caregivers will be taking care of the baby for the first year of its life, and that daycare is no place to send a babyor less that s the gist of what he says Although my own son didn t start daycare until he was well within his second year of life, I was rather aghast at this comment Most American women are lucky to get 6 weeks of paid maternity leave and then must return to work if they want or need to keep their jobs, so I couldn t believe that Dr Sears offhandedly made this remark as if it could so easily apply to so many mothers Then he goes into a description of his ideal work childcare balance for mothers, which includes asking your boss if you can havetime off, bringing baby to work with you, going part time or giving up your career at least temporarily, and becoming some sort of activist for mothers rights within the workplace Again, for most moms these are simply not feasible options and many bosses would laugh or worse at such requests There is a even an illustration featuring an ideal situation of a mom working at home she is typing on the computer while baby is calmly playing in a nearby room I m sorry but what in the ever living heck is he talking about When I try to work at home while taking care of my sons, I get very little of either goal accomplished My son either runs wild and tries to destroy the house or himself, or my work is equally neglected I feel that Dr Sears must be living on some other male oriented planet to really think that such an arrangement could work well for very long at all And while I wish and hope that maternity leave policies and laws would change in the US, for right now women are stuck with the harsh reality of choosing between work and attachment parenting and for many women it s not a choice they could feasibly make Let s face it attachment parenting takes a lot of time and work on the mother s behalf Sure, there s a section for fathers that instructs them on how to be involved in attachment parenting and how to help their mates, but the majority of carrying and feeding for an attachment parented child necessarily falls on Mom s shoulders It s nice for Dad to be able to sneak in some skin to skin with Baby while he watches a baseball game, or wear him around the park, but as soon as Baby starts giving hunger cues, the breastfeeding B of attachment parenting necessitates that Mom and her heroic boobies show up to save the day While I know many women who practice attachment parenting, most of them are stay at home moms at least in some capacity they either work part time or at least temporarily not at all There s also the option of hiring a nanny and training her in attachment parenting techniques, which the book recommends as a last resort substitute if preferably Mom or else another family member can t be around to attachment parent all day Obviously such an option costs a lot of money and is another way that the book seems to act like every mother has the privilege of either not working or hiring a nanny to do attachment parenting tasks To be fair, the book does say that one doesn t have to use all of the suggestions and that moms can just attachment parent in whatever ways they feel fit, but the choice to attachment parent is inherently a pretty extreme one that does take up most of Mom s free time and career options, at least for the first year or so I could be wrong, and would love to hear from parents who did these things while working and without hiring a nanny specially trained caregiver who could wear their child around all day Finally, the other thing that bothered me was the lack of citations to studies or other research that proved this method correct I read nonfiction parenting books for research and I like to find out the why and how behind the methods urged This book was mostly made up of anecdotal stories from Dr Sears and other parents Yes, Dr Sears is a doctor and he and his wife have something like 8 kids, but they literally use their experiments with their kids as their research It always bugs me when I m at a doctor s appointment and my kid s pediatrician says, Well I did this with my daughter so I m recommending it to you I get that 9 out of 10 doctors do this with their own kid is supposed to be some ringing endorsement like the kind we hear in toothpaste commercials, but to me it means just a little bitthan diddly squat I m glad that these methods worked for the author but without any kind of impartial studies, it s still a parenting style preference rather than a method that has much backing behind it I don t spank my kids not only because I can t even imagine striking them or any other human being or other animal but also because I ve read a ton of research that it does themharm than good I breastfeed my kids not only because it s free and convenient and because my boobs won t stop leaking all this milk all the time, but also because I ve read a ton of research that it s good for both them and me I also believe based on common sense that a tiny helpless newborn needs to have his cries responded to and his needs attended to But I have yet to see meaningful research on co sleeping versus cry it out techniques, baby wearing versus sitting them down in the latest contraption that costs 500 to shake, rock and roll the baby all day, or keeping your kid tied to your side in a sling versus putting them in daycare for socialization and learning opportunities and part of the reason I read this book was to find out about such research So I was very disappointed that there was little to no actual research and instead just feel good stories about why this stuff worked for Dr Sears, his children, his patients, and random people who had read his book I also thought that there were some pretty outrageous claims made or implied for instance, that kids who are attachment parented may be at less risk for developing things like autism or ADD without any kind of science to back it up I feel like that s a little irresponsible if not outright manipulative I do get that it s Dr Sears theory and that he doesn t outright claim it s some science, but I just feel like it might make parents of children with conditions feel guilty for not nearly smothering them to sleep every night or not carrying them around in a colorful ring sling all day I realize I ve been extremely critical of this book but I think it s just because I had such high hopes for it I do feel that attachment parenting suits me and my children well, I feel grateful for the opportunity to be able to do it and I plan to continue doing it Right now I ve had my second son and I feel a lotconfident in my parenting style and decisions than I did with my first son And yet I still realize that it s a parenting style choice rather than some scientific or medical mandate, and I don t judge parents who choose a different way, which I kind of felt like the book did There were a lot of good points in the book and my copy is so dog eared with things I want to look back on and save So I did enjoy it and find it useful, but I also had criticisms of it that I wasn t expecting Overall I would recommend the book but of course take all the advice with a grain of salt, and make sure you re wearing your baby while you read it


  8. Shelly Leyden Shelly Leyden says:

    Instinctively hate parenting books But on the way to becoming an actual parent, figured I should read some anyhow Because I was never one of those kids who liked dolls Or littler kids Or people, really, TBH Plus, I embarked on the parenting journey at a pretty unique time First off, we were at what felt like the forefront of a new approach to parenting College educated professional go getters who knew how to manage a project, we naturally brought our skills to bear on the childbearing Instinctively hate parenting books But on the way to becoming an actual parent, figured I should read some anyhow Because I was never one of those kids who liked dolls Or littler kids Or people, really, TBH Plus, I embarked on the parenting journey at a pretty unique time First off, we were at what felt like the forefront of a new approach to parenting College educated professional go getters who knew how to manage a project, we naturally brought our skills to bear on the childbearing milieu, too We looked at our parent s practices and our own childhood experiences to suss out where things went right or wrong We talked to people and read books and studied various philosophies to gather best practices best for the baby and for our marriages and for the planet, and sometimes even admittedly for ourselves We looked at various approaches, products, tools, and services to find better ways to get the job done Because job it full well is, and we knew it But Second off, I found to my surprise my conclusions to be off kilter from many of my peers I was raised by a working mother I assumed that s what we d all want to be At college, among other things, I studied up on a women s movement nominally bent on ensuring we d not be trapped by some kind of biological destiny I pursued a career that made me the breadwinner in the years before motherhood Whilst trying for and then gestating a baby, however, I woke up to the fact that nearly every one of my girlfriends planned to be a stay at home mother I was at first floored, and then took quite a while to figure out my own stance vis a vis this astonishing development And Third off, technology wasandof a factor for me and my mom friends Nowadays, if we didn t all have phones, we d miss out on much family bonding with our teens and tweens via text But back then When I had little kids, I didn t even have a mobile phone much less a smartphone Blogging was barely a thing, either, folks We looked to the internet for ideas, but that mostly meant hitting a few big brand websites from our work computers to read baby product reviews during lunch break Oh And we d make playdates by emailing or calling each other well ahead of time, people Like from landlines Well ahead I know It sounds weird, but at a time when we new mothers barely knew when or how we might successfully eat or sleep or put fresh clothes on, we had to plan ahead if we wanted to connect with other grown ups who might have direct insight on our day to day experiences So I read this book, and formulated a firm opinion that my husband and me would be attachment parents I put a sling and a Baby Bjorn on my baby shower registry, natch I sneered at the idea of a bassinet and even wondered whether we really should shell out for a crib at all Co sleeping is natural to humans, yo And cribs are like, overpriced baby danger zones I planned to breastfeed, and got myself a cray expensive pump to keep it up after returning to work I did not go all the way to cloth diaper land, but I thought hard about it so as to come to a conscious decision And I did make my own baby food Using organic superfoods, see, because that s obvi best for baby After as long with the breast as possible, I mean I also came to the conclusion that while I did not want to stay home in a longterm way, I didn t want to be trapped into going back to work before I was good and ready, either I wanted to manage stay at home motherhood like a project Timeboxed at like, one year Timeline to be re assessed if ever I began to feel trapped at home, but also to be extended if a year turned out to be not long enough I managed to string together maternity leave and vacay time and squirrel away extra funds to cover my preferred timeline And I loved it And hated it But really, really loved it I loved how I worked up to the very last moment, leaving the office on the big day already in labor I loved how we connected at home calmly jittery but in control and figured out together when to go to the birthing center The car ride was crazy, and when we arrived I can t say all went perfectly But we survived, as did most of my parts And we got a wonderfully healthy, scrawny tiny baby out of the deal I loved how once he was in my arms, despite my life s nearly complete non preparation for this event, I knew him Knew just how to cradle him and what he could handle, tiny and fragile seeming as he was Yet Of course there were moments of pure panic And boredom And despair I did feel trapped not just at home, but in my nursing chair This kid would feed 24x7 if I let him And at first, I pretty much did let him He was incredibly skinny and somewhat fussy He was very strong He magically quieted outside, listening and looking around in plain wonder He had a long attention span He preferred to be carried tummy down, like a football He would sleep, eventually, for a little while Especially if on my person I carried him everywhere It was all magical that May And June And July He was happy and funny and adorable Old ladies loved on him in every store We drove in the car We flew on a plane He grew Then one day in August, I knew what I knew Real family life doesn t follow a book, or a guru Real family life is uniquely our own, for us to make, together In our real family life, I m a person, too Sorry, Dr Sears, but I know who I am and what I m up against better than any of you Texas summers are hot My needs matter in this family of ours, and indeed, the old saying s too true When mama ain t happy, ain t nobody happy My bed was too overcrowded and overheated with three people in it Luckily, someone had insisted on giving us a crib In which, to this point, our baby had spent the teensiest tiniest possible time napping Thus I began the terrible work of acquainting my child with cool sheets and clear spaces I introduced the concept very gently He disagreed rather vehemently Would go down, but refused to stay down long Putting this demon baby to bed became a crazy exhausting process with no real end I was like to die One night, husband out of town on biz, babe finally abed, I just sat there shellshocked and suffering PTSD Waiting for my boy to go off like a baby sized bomb blast Which he would in 3, 2, 1 And when he did I just couldn t Could not go in and nurse him another minute Almost could not even get up off the couch And so I didn t Instead, I cried He cried, too I visited to be sure he was safe, then turned on the TV and cried someMy way was mostly quiet whimpering, his was the opposite Until it wasn t OMG Sleep happened Happened all night long For both of us Separately So in the end, I did what I d sworn I d not do Ferberized my baby The good news Didn t need to read a book to do it Just did it my own exhaustion is the mother of invention way And I ve mostly sworn off parenting books since MapMyReadingLife


  9. Amber Lav Amber Lav says:

    I loved this book Every parent has or will have a different parenting style, and this book accepts that, muchthan the other baby books I ve read Babywise, anyone The main point to this book is basically to follow your instincts, and to do what is best for you, your baby and your family It has several suggestions on how to get there 5 B s but at the end of the day continues to stress to do what is best for you and your family I love that I also found it very comforting in regards I loved this book Every parent has or will have a different parenting style, and this book accepts that, muchthan the other baby books I ve read Babywise, anyone The main point to this book is basically to follow your instincts, and to do what is best for you, your baby and your family It has several suggestions on how to get there 5 B s but at the end of the day continues to stress to do what is best for you and your family I love that I also found it very comforting in regards to just accepting the personality of the baby you have, and going with it It was really nice to find a book about parenting written by parents who literally seem to have seen almost every situation, including special needs, high needs babies loved that term it s a lot better than constantly trying to find words to say your baby isn t difficult, or other somewhat derogatory terms and adoption Yes, it has faults, like pushing beware of baby trainers but overall this is one of the best books on parenting, and finding your parenting style, without making you feel like garbage for not having a baby that fits the mould of other baby books


  10. Jennifer Brukiewa Jennifer Brukiewa says:

    I read many parenting books when I was pregnant with our 1st daughter and this was the first one I picked up This is not the philosophy we chose for our infants initially, but it lookedandlike this with each kido I know parents who have taken this road and I respect it It is not wrong, just not right for us As with any parenting book and philosophy it depends on the heart and wisdom of the parent The tools can differ, but if used in love, there are many mediums to becoming an a I read many parenting books when I was pregnant with our 1st daughter and this was the first one I picked up This is not the philosophy we chose for our infants initially, but it lookedandlike this with each kido I know parents who have taken this road and I respect it It is not wrong, just not right for us As with any parenting book and philosophy it depends on the heart and wisdom of the parent The tools can differ, but if used in love, there are many mediums to becoming an artist in parenting For my fist babies we wentthe Babywise route Insert collective gasp here There are things I would do differently now, as I have told one of my attachment parenting friends I would snuggle and hold , rock to sleep and stress less about a schedule You ll notice I gave Babywise the same rating Live and learn May God s grace guide us all I highly recommend, Grace Based Parenting by DR Tim Kimmel There is such refreshing freedom given in that book


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The Attachment Parenting Book: A Commonsense Guide to Understanding and Nurturing Your Baby ✽ [EPUB] ✵ The Attachment Parenting Book: A Commonsense Guide to Understanding and Nurturing Your Baby By William Sears ❧ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk America s foremost baby and childcare experts, William Sears MD and Martha Sears, RN explain the benefits for both you and your child of connecting with your baby early Would you and your baby both sl America s Parenting Book: PDF ✓ foremost baby and childcare experts, William Sears MD The Attachment PDF/EPUB or and Martha Sears, RN explain the benefits for both you and Attachment Parenting Book: eBook ↠ your child of connecting with your baby early Would you and your baby both sleep better if you shared a bed How old is too old for breastfeeding What is a father s role in nurturing a newborn How does early attachment foster a child s eventual independence Dr Bill and Martha Sears the doctor and nurse, husband and wife team who coined the term attachment parenting answer these and many questions in this practical, inspiring guide Attachment parenting is a style of parenting that encourages a strong early attachment, and advocates parental responsiveness to babies dependency needs The Attachment Parenting Book clearly explains the six Baby B s that form the basis of this popular parenting style Bonding, Breastfeeding, Babywearing, Bedding close to baby, Belief in the language value of baby s cry, and Beware of baby trainers Here s all the information you need to achieve your most important goals as a new parent to know your child, to help your child feel right, and to enjoy parenting.