All's Well That Ends WellAs You Like ItComedy of

All's Well That Ends WellAs You Like ItComedy of ErrorsLove's Labour's LostMeasure for MeasureMerchant of VeniceMerry Wives of WindsorMidsummer Night's DreamMuch Ado About NothingTaming of the ShrewTempestTwelfth NightT [PDF / Epub] ★ All's Well That Ends WellAs You Like ItComedy of ErrorsLove's Labour's LostMeasure for MeasureMerchant of VeniceMerry Wives of WindsorMidsummer Night's DreamMuch Ado About NothingTaming of the ShrewTempestTwelfth NightT Author Stephen Greenblatt – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Instructors and students worldwide welcomed the fresh scholarship lively and accessible introductions helpful marginal glosses and notes readable single column format all designed in support of the go Instructors and students worldwide welcomed the fresh scholarship That Ends PDF Ê lively and accessible introductions helpful marginal glosses and notes readable single column format all designed in support of the goal of the Oxford text to bring the modern reader closer than before possible to Shakespeare's plays as they were first acted Now under Stephen Greenblatt's direction the editors have considered afresh each introduction and all of All's Well PDF \ the apparatus to make the Second Edition an even better teaching tool.


10 thoughts on “All's Well That Ends WellAs You Like ItComedy of ErrorsLove's Labour's LostMeasure for MeasureMerchant of VeniceMerry Wives of WindsorMidsummer Night's DreamMuch Ado About NothingTaming of the ShrewTempestTwelfth NightT

  1. sch sch says:

    11 Jul 2018 And The Taming of the Shrew too why not This is the best performance of the three and a hilarious play11 Jul 2018 Reading Twelfth Night for the first time Not my favorite but I'm willing to try another productionMar 2017 Rereading Midsummer to teach In this production the aristocrats and mechanicals are great The fairies are too goofy for my taste


  2. Caroline Caroline says:

    You either love or hate the comedies I’m for the tragedies and histories because everyone dies Additionally while these may be called comedies some messed up stuff always happens and they can be disturbing It’s a hard pill to swallow when you think of what people in the time of Shakespeare found comedic


  3. D.M. D.M. says:

    I'd read a handful of these before and feel pretty much the same about the ones I'd read as I already did The only ones I found unpleasant were Much Ado and The Winter's Tale both of which I feel like were written by someone elseAnyway here's the rundown Tempest was funnier than I was expecting Merchant Of Venice still kind of bothers me As You Like It is clearly a farce not really my kind of thing but still okay Taming Of The Shrew is fun although a little than offensive to modern sensibilities Measure For Measure was alright but mostly forgettable Had a really hard time getting into Much Ado About Nothing and it's one of a couple that just don't read like the others Twelfth Night which I remember enjoying last time I read it was just as much fun this time around and just as confusing The Winter's Tale was not so great and written in a veryI don't knowstacatto pattern? And Midsummer Night's Dream I actually enjoyed than either of the times I've read it before I don't know whyThis edition has a front plate detail from Walter Howell Deverell's 'Twelfth Night Act II Scene IV The text is reproduced from a 1906 edition by Dent Sons of London It includes a fairly useless glossary in the end


  4. Barbara Barbara says:

    This volume is from the Shakespeare His Work and World series and is jam packed with information about the Bard In six chapters it provides a history of comedy traced from its Greek origins and Aristotle to Shakespeare’s time and a chronological examination and synopses of Shakespeare’s comedies The treatment is surprisingly in depth and scholarly for such a slim volume Sidebars give the background of some important historical or fictional people who influenced Shakespeare as well as other influential works or plays One of the sidebars is about cross dressing in Shakespeare Vivid photographs of various productions of the plays on stage as well as in movies are sprinkled throughout the volume The last chapter describes the evolution of “Shakespeare’s playhouse” the Globe Theatre to the present day The book contains a table of contents a glossary index and a bibliography Student researchers will find this resource useful


  5. Charles Berteau Charles Berteau says:

    Review carried forward from Facebook wallI just finished The Winter's Tale to complete my reading of the fourteen plays contained in The Comedies by William Shakespeare one of The 100 Greatest Ever Written series I started this book in April of 2009 so it has taken a while – I do enjoy Shakespeare but in small doses and certainly not enough to read an 1100 page collection straight throughBefore I started this book I hadn’t read too many of Shakespeare’s plays and I had read none of his comedies Some I enjoyed thoroughly some not so much – and I certainly learned that calling these “comedies” stretches the modern use of that term even considering the language challenges Rarely does one laugh out loud perhaps “The Ironies” would be descriptive


  6. Petruccio Hambasket IV Petruccio Hambasket IV says:

    Sure it's true that the Norton Comedies has all of em at least by my lazy count but can we talk about how thin the pages are in this edition? Touching these pages often reminds me of the feeling I get when wielding any of that 1 ply public washroom type toilet paper This is uite unfortunate as it would suggest that the written words are the excrement intended for such uality loose leafbut this is certainly not the caseThey're so thin and frail I'm forced to constantly monitor my page turning speed in fear of ripping the entire tome to shredsThe pages are so thin the resolution of The Two Gentlemen of Verona was given to me 3 pages ahead because i could see through to the other side of the writingOther then that the Shakespeares nice


  7. Kriss Kriss says:

    I took what felt like a long time but I did it I couldn't have done it without the Notes and Glossary in the back of the book ok I could have but it would have taken a lot time to look things up I thought at first this might have been too much Shakespeare to read at one time It didn't take me long to realize I actually prefer it The I read the easier it got I was getting and familar with the language and writing I still prefer to watch the plays rather than read them Some stories were better than others but I expected that


  8. William Herbst William Herbst says:

    This is currently my favorite edition of Shakespeare's writings I cannot comment on the editorial choices in presenting the text as I am not at all familiar with the manuscript tradition but the notes are abundant and informative There is the perfect amount of commentary before each play for my admittedly casual taste I read individual plays and commentaries from this series as the mood strikes me or if I am planning to see a performance I have not read this series cover to cover


  9. Michael P. Michael P. says:

    These plays are great the introduction to Shakespearean comedy by Katharine Eisaman Maus in notable but unfortunately the Norton Shakespeare uses the dodgy Oxford Complete Shakespeare texts albeit with modifications for pedagogical reasons This will be corrected in the third edition due in 2015 I'd wait for that This is a fine edition in every way but the texts but isn't that what it is really all about?


  10. Terence Manleigh Terence Manleigh says:

    As You Like It Twelfth Night Much Ado About Nothing Love’s Labours Lost A Midsummer Night’s Dream and these just scratch the surface of the joys sparkling between the covers of this book At times Shakespeare’s joyous wit and psychological genius make the best of these plays soar beyond comedy to a place somewhere next to wisdom literature


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