!!> Epub ➣ Womens Work ➢ Author Elizabeth Wayland Barber – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

Womens Work New Discoveries About The Textile Arts Reveal Women S Unexpectedly Influential Role In Ancient Societies.Twenty Thousand Years Ago, Women Were Making And Wearing The First Clothing Created From Spun Fibers In Fact, Right Up To The Industrial Revolution The Fiber Arts Were An Enormous Economic Force, Belonging Primarily To Women.Despite The Great Toil Required In Making Cloth And Clothing, Most Books On Ancient History And Economics Have No Information On Them Much Of This Gap Results From The Extreme Perishability Of What Women Produced, But It Seems Clear That Until Now Descriptions Of Prehistoric And Early Historic Cultures Have Omitted Virtually Half The Picture.Elizabeth Wayland Barber Has Drawn From Data Gathered By The Most Sophisticated New Archaeological Methods Methods She Herself Helped To Fashion.


10 thoughts on “Womens Work

  1. says:

    It took me far too long to write about this book Barber is the most engaging of fiber art historians, hands down The discipline has received far too little attention for far too many years, and it is wonderful to see so well respected a scholar attack, and love, the subject She is a weaver and general fiber artist as well as a linguist and archaeologist That combination of disciplines lends her rare insight She can spot bad research miles away and can also admit when she makes mistakes in h It took me far too long to write about this book Barber is the most engaging of fiber art historians, hands down The discipline has received far too little attention for far too many years, and it is wonde...


  2. says:

    I first read this book many years ago, and was recently reminded of it Very much an answer for all those people who look at standard histories and ask, But what were the women doing all that time It was also once favorably reviewed in Sci...


  3. says:

    One of the most interesting books I ve ever read, although I m sure it won t sound that way when I describe it It s a discussion of weaving and its relation to women s historical roles The two are interconnected in some complicated and fascinat...


  4. says:

    This is basically the Guns, Germs, and Steel of textiles, fabrics, and the women who weave with them My entry point in this book was Gregory Clark s excellent Big History book A Farewell to Alms, where he discussed how in large part the first phase of the Industrial Revolution was almost entirely driven by productivity improvements in the textile industry Weaving being then as now a primarily female dominated industry, I was interested to learnabout the sociological effects of that revol This is basically the Guns, Germs, and Steel of textiles, fabrics, and the women who weave with them My entry point in this book was Gregory Clark s excellent Big History book A Farewell to Alms, where he discussed how in large part the first phase of the Industrial Revolution was almost entirely driven by productivity improvements in the textile industry Weaving being then as now a primarily female dominated industry, I was interested to learnabout the sociological effects of that revolution, and though this book wasn t what I was expecting at all, covering only from the Paleolithic to the Iron Age, there s still lots that should be right up the alley of anyone looking for something in the intersection of archaeology, textiles, and the feminization of labor.There are probably many different economic rationales for why some professions have been considered women s work for tens of thousands of years, but the most basic one is pretty straightforward if some relatively simple task is compatible...


  5. says:

    The book really hasof a focus on the Bronze Age than the Stone Age, with extensive sections on weaving in Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt, and the Aegean so much so that I ve moved it from my Stone Age section to my Bronze Age section It is worth noting that, being published over 20 years ago, the book is out of date in some of its information For example, the author repeats the hypothesis of goddess worship at Catalhoyuk, something which site director Ian Hodder and his international team The book really hasof a focus on the Bronze Age than the Stone Age, with extensive sections on weaving in Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt, and the Aegean so much so that I ve moved it from my Stone Age section to my Bronze Age section It is worth noting that, being published over 20 years ago, the book is out ...


  6. says:

    I don t care who you are 20,000 years is a long time What this book tells us is simple Women clothed the human race because it was something they could do while raising the next generation There are cultures where this is still the case.It was a tradeoff and a good one But the sheer skill required to create first thread then weaving it into cloth is very hard to grasp Unless, of cour...


  7. says:

    This book is lauded in crafty fiber circles, apparently for being the only one of its kind to focus on women s history rather than for giving any great insight about archaeology or, you know, the titular women s work.I mean, okay, it s still interesting and informative and fairly well written But it snon fiction than scholarly , and I took off a star for that there isn t enough meat on these bones, not enough exploration or discussion Some parts are deeply repetitive and some parts b This book is lauded in crafty fiber circles, apparently for being the only one of its kind to focus on women s history rather than for giving any great insight about archaeology or, you know, the titular women s work.I mean, okay, it s still interesting and informative and fairly well written But it snon fiction than scholarly , and I took off a star for that there isn t enough meat on these bones, not enough exploration or discussion Some parts are deeply repetitive and some parts build off each other, so it doesn t pay to read straight through and it doesn t pay to pick and choose chapters that s another star gone The author learned to weave as a child, and it shows She probably knows how to spin, too there s some familiarity with spindles but I am a spinner myself and her explanations gave upquestions than answers She says this low whorl type of spindle is suited for wool, and...


  8. says:

    Excellent book on the origins and development of spinning and weaving in Middle East and Europe Ms Barber, an archeologist and weaver, has an engaging style She not only tells us what we know about the early history of weaving, she shows us how we know She is also very apolitical in her approach she neither praises nor condemns the treatment of women throughout this early period of history Neolithic to the Iron Age She restricts herself to the data Highly recommended for those intereste Excellent book on the origins and development of spinning and weaving in Middle East and Europe Ms Ba...


  9. says:

    Wonderful book, full of insights Women s role changes through history, but the constant is that women have the primary responsibility of early childhood rearing Women s work always has to be something that could be combined...


  10. says:

    Women s history and textiles This is my wheelhouse A very readable interesting examination of textiles and what we can deduce about them and about the women almost always women who made them This book makes me want to learn how to spin and weave, but I m not going to, because NO NEW HOBB...


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