[PDF] ↠ Three Novels of Old New York Author Edith Wharton – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

Three Novels of Old New York Edith Wharton Made The World Of Old New York Her Own, The Wealthy High Society So Powerfully Depicted In These Three Elegantly Ironic Novels Revolving Around The Marriage Question, They Explore The Dilemma Of Women And Men Held Within The Rigid Bounds Of Social Convention Thus In The House Of Mirth, The Novel That First Brought Edith Wharton To Fame, The Complex, Poignant Heroine Lily Bart Must Either Break Away And Find A Meaningful Existence, Or Become A Part Of The Superficial Values Of The Nouveaux Riches In The Custom Of The Country, The Energetic And Ambitious Undine Spragg Works Her Way To Wealth Anti Power Through A Succession Of Marriages While Newland Archer In The Age Of Innocence Is Caught In An Agony Of Indecision Whether He Should Choose The Duty Of A Socially Approved Marriage, Or The Love Of A Woman Frowned Upon By Decent Society.


10 thoughts on “Three Novels of Old New York

  1. says:

    What an amazing experience it was to read The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence back to back One written early in Wharton s career and the other at the end Wharton s writing is luminous and her perspicacious portrait of New York society in the Gilded ...


  2. says:

    I read the first book in this collection, The House of Mirthit was frustrating and depressing I have not moved on to either of the others I do love the old way of writing so I gave it three stars, but I found the inability of the characters to speak truthfully to each other, which would have made t...


  3. says:

    All three of these books, especially The Age of Innocence, touch on the timeless hypocrisy of life and society It amazes me how much hasn t changed since 1900..


  4. says:

    Edith Wharton was perhaps the premier novelist of late nineteenth century New York high society.The heroine of the first novel in this collection The House of Mirth is a beautiful woman of good birth These traits give her entree into the best houses, as well as the attention of numerous suitors At the same time, her position is tenuous Her parents are deceased a...


  5. says:

    The Age of Innocence Memorable and moving A delightful and appropriate ending A lovely and haunting read.The House of Mirth Although it is a bit transparent, moralistic and histrionic, I love her descriptions of inner torment and it s rare to meet an omniscient narrator who has as much respect for her characters as Wharton I loved this book Her management of tension was superb and her characters carefully drawn A delight.The Custom of the Country Frustrating because of how well written the The Age of Innocence Memorable and moving A delightful and appropriate ending A lovely and haunting read.The House of Mirth Although it is a bit transparent, moralistic and histrionic, I love her descriptions of inner torment and it s rare to meet an omniscient narrator who has as much respect for her character...


  6. says:

    House of Mirth.


  7. says:

    America and Europe of the 1800s were stiff, gilded, formal place, full of old families, rigid customs and social transgressions.And nobody chronicled them better than Edith Wharton, who spun exquisitely barbed novels out of the social clashes of the late nineteenth century Three Novels of New York The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence contains some of the best work she ever did, exploring the nature of infidelity, passion, social climbing and a woman s place i America and Europe of the 1800s were stiff, gilded, formal place, f...


  8. says:

    I just finished The Age of Innocence I read The House of Mirth years ago and loved it, but hadn t read anything else by Wharton until now I thought that this was a really humorous and interesting look at New York Society It was rather different than the serious and sometimes upsetting story of The House of Mirth, but I quite enjoyed it It did seem to drag a bit at the beginning until you began to differen...


  9. says:

    I can t find The Custom of the Country by itself here, but I just recently read it based on a New Yorker article about Edith Wharton The arricle argued that the novel rivals The Great Gatsby as a commenraey on early 29th century A...


  10. says:

    Sowhat can I say about Custom of the Country and The House of Mirth Well, I the book they were both in the same collection across the room onthan one occasion The characters make you crazy, but you can t stop reading The Age of Innocence was also excellent I think I threw that one only once.