Döşeğimde Ölürken MOBI Ê Paperback


    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format n karakterlerinin g zleriyle sesi kendi i ine d n p a lay n dinlemeye koyulmu gibidir D zyaz y iirselle tirmekte s rad bir yetene i olan Faulkner n bu roman , sezgilerin, duyarl klar n, i seslerin, bo luklar n destan d r D e imde l rken in bir Amerikal taraf ndan yaz lm en zg n roman oldu u s ylenebilir Faulkner,y zy l n en b y k romanc lar aras nda Harold Bloom."/>
  • Paperback
  • 222 pages
  • Döşeğimde Ölürken
  • William Faulkner
  • Turkish
  • 04 October 2018

10 thoughts on “Döşeğimde Ölürken

  1. AmyAmy AmyAmy says:

    I know you re supposed to love this book because it s Faulker, but I HATED IT I know you re cool and intelligent if you read Faulkner, but I can t stand him Sorry, I don t know what he s talking about and at the risk of sounding immodest, I am bright I DON T think it s cool and hip to write in a confusing manner, and I don t try to impress others by liking ambiguity I had my fill in college with snobs who pretended to like this stuff Sorry I sound harsh here I m really a nice per I know you re supposed to love this book because it s Faulker, but I HATED IT I know you re cool and intelligent if you read Faulkner, but I can t stand him Sorry, I don t know what he s talking about and at the risk of sounding immodest, I am bright I DON T think it s cool and hip to write in a confusing manner, and I don t try to impress others by liking ambiguity I had my fill in college with snobs who pretended to like this stuff Sorry I sound harsh here I m really a nice person , but YUK


  2. Emily May Emily May says:

    I ve been working up to a William Faulkner book for years His books always appear on lists of best books of all time and books you should read before you die But when I ve felt in the mood for a classic or something literary , I ve always passed him up for other authors, even those with 1000 page monsters I think, deep down, I always sensed Faulkner just wasn t for me.The first problem is my lack of enthusiasm for stream of consciousness narratives If I m being honest, I rarely like it I ve been working up to a William Faulkner book for years His books always appear on lists of best books of all time and books you should read before you die But when I ve felt in the mood for a classic or something literary , I ve always passed him up for other authors, even those with 1000 page monsters I think, deep down, I always sensed Faulkner just wasn t for me.The first problem is my lack of enthusiasm for stream of consciousness narratives If I m being honest, I rarely like it I don t mind working at a book if it s hard going, but this style of narration makes it difficult for me, personally, to ever settle into the rhythm of the book And Faulkner takes it to a whole new level He drops us into scenes and scenarios without any explanation I genuinely felt like Faulkner wanted to deliberately confuse his readers about characters and ideas he could have easily portrayed in aaccessible way Confusion for confusion s sake.Honestly, I can think of littleboring than suffering through every thought, feeling and instinct that passes through the human mind I have my own mind that plagues me with this randomness I don t need to read it in someone else s perspective I want an author to organize language into a structure that is interesting, compelling, thought provoking and stream of consciousness, for me, is rarely any of those things.But that s just my tastes for the style Trying to take a step away from that a second and view what the novel did as a whole, I can t say I enjoyed the story Nor do I tend to enjoy books withthan two or three perspectives and this one had fifteen In less than three hundred pages The plot follows the Bundren family after the death of their matriarch, Addie Fifteen perspectives tell the story of the family s journey to Jefferson, where Addie is to be buried Hauling a wagon with Addie s decomposing body, the Bundren family sets out on a nine day journey of frequent hunger and discomfort Faulkner includes important themes in his work, such as religion, poverty and identity in the Southern United States, but I still feel like other authors have done this in apalatable way I would much rather read Steinbeck any day.One reviewer said this of Faulkner s style and I couldn t agreeIt is easy to be confusing It is easy to write something beautiful and understandable for yourself It s hard to write universal words which we can all connect. So, so true.Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube


  3. Michael Finocchiaro Michael Finocchiaro says:

    Where to start with a masterpiece that is both short like the distance between two thoughts and deep as the thoughts themselves This is one of Faulkner s true masterpieces a grotesque road trip with a rotting corpse told in the voices of the extremely dysfunctional and occasionally insane family members It is Ulysses in the Southern United States, or a Georgian Grapes of Wrath Faulkner having been inspired by the former and certainly influenced the latter The writing is some of the most po Where to start with a masterpiece that is both short like the distance between two thoughts and deep as the thoughts themselves This is one of Faulkner s true masterpieces a grotesque road trip with a rotting corpse told in the voices of the extremely dysfunctional and occasionally insane family members It is Ulysses in the Southern United States, or a Georgian Grapes of Wrath Faulkner having been inspired by the former and certainly influenced the latter The writing is some of the most powerful that Faulkner ever produced I would think how words go straight up in a thin line, quick and harmless, and how terribly doing goes along the earth, clinging to it, so that after a while the two lines are too far apart for the same person to straddle from one to the other and that sin and love and fear are just sounds that people who never sinned nor loved nor feared have for what they never had and cannot have until they forget the words.The words leap off the page and both drawn you into their language s inner beauty and repulse you for the violence he depicts It is as visceral as a slaughterhouse complete with awls piercing caskets and yetoptimistic than this generation s Walking Dead.One of the greatest American novels ever written and one that will still be as moving and relevant centuries from now as it speaks eternal truth in the American vernacular A must


  4. Nicholas Armstrong Nicholas Armstrong says:

    And since sleep is is not and rain and wind are was, it is not Yet the wagon is, because when the wagon is was, Addie Bundren will not be And Jewel is, so Addie Bundren must be And then I must be, or I could not empty myself for sleep in a strange room And so if I am not emptied yet, I am is There are people who actually like this Seriously though, I m pretty sure I get it, I just don t like it There is a family and each one is a reflection of a way of living, or in some case And since sleep is is not and rain and wind are was, it is not Yet the wagon is, because when the wagon is was, Addie Bundren will not be And Jewel is, so Addie Bundren must be And then I must be, or I could not empty myself for sleep in a strange room And so if I am not emptied yet, I am is There are people who actually like this Seriously though, I m pretty sure I get it, I just don t like it There is a family and each one is a reflection of a way of living, or in some cases, a way of dying Anse is the woe is me type and Addie is the Serve your purpose and die type and that s all well and good, and it s a pretty cool idea for a book, I just don t like Faulkner Do you know that skill has very little to do with the process of inventing a concept I m still not entirely convinced that Faulkner is the genius he is made out to be In fact, I m not entirely convinced I should like him at all Based off his biography he is kind of a pathetic, lying, failure so what am I supposed to think of his writing Stream of consciousness is one thing, writing in Faulkner s way is another Scenes are dropped onto our heads in ways we cannot comprehend and actions are portrayed without explanation And do you know the unfairest cut of all Faulkner knows what he is trying to say, he knows all about these characters, he just isn t showing us anything An example originally there were no names at the beginning of the chapters Yeah, no kidding He just wrote this shit with no explanation of our speaker and expected us to figure it out That is not genius Writing is about making a connection to a stranger, bridging a gap of confusion to create understanding and to share an idea, a theme, an image with thousands or millions of people who you ve never met Faulkner writes in jargon he understands with little to no respect for the reader and I can t forgive him for it If you don t believe me then write something Write a short story Write 3, or 4, or 5 pages Flesh out the characters and their histories and their conflicts Got it Okay, now when you are writing a scene with multiple people use only the pronoun he You will know who you are talking about do we Is that good writing No, it isn t.It is easy to be confusing It is easy to write something beautiful and understandable for yourself It s hard to write universal words which we can all connect Good idea, Faulkner, poor performance


  5. Ademption Ademption says:

    THIS BOOK IS ABOUT HICKS THEY GO TO TOWN


  6. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    Once you get past the ungainly oddness and wild strangeness which assails you from every direction, then you can see the weirdness which lies beyond The story, and there is a very strong clear linear narrative here, is wonderfully stupid A back country family in Mississippi in the 20s has their dear mama Addie Bundren up and die on them and the lazy ass sumbitch daddy thinks he then has to carry out her settled dying wish which, very unreasonably, was to get buried with her own kin 40 miles a Once you get past the ungainly oddness and wild strangeness which assails you from every direction, then you can see the weirdness which lies beyond The story, and there is a very strong clear linear narrative here, is wonderfully stupid A back country family in Mississippi in the 20s has their dear mama Addie Bundren up and die on them and the lazy ass sumbitch daddy thinks he then has to carry out her settled dying wish which, very unreasonably, was to get buried with her own kin 40 miles away in Jefferson This wouldn t be so bad except it s the height of summer and there s just been bad rains and a flood, so the bridges over the river are down The whole passel of them, four sons, one daughter, one daddy, two mules and one horse, nevertheless trek off to do the right thing To say they encounter obstacles would be to say nought but the truth One such is that before very long Addie starts to decomp, to which many passing strangers take exception So it s kind of a comic tale but it ain t told comically No sir No ma am The guides will say the same thing about this short but dense like a black hole novel As I Lay Dying is written as a series of stream of consciousness monologues, in which the characters thoughts are presented in all their uncensored chaos, without the organizing presence of an objective narrator. That s from the online Spark Notes Fair enough , except that it s just completely not true All the short chapters are headed up with a character name, and it kind of naturally seems as if that character is narrating, but a only occasionally could you call anything in this book stream of consciousness, and even then it s nothing at all like our old beloved friends Virginia Woolf or James Joyce because these interior monologues come at you in perfectly formed and mostly graceful sentences and b The chapters obey no consistent rules or they change the rules all the time which is the same thing, so that in the middle of a paragraph it is suddenly the author s omniscient voice popping up And another thing what Faulkner does all the time is bend the credibility of the characters voices until they break Here s two examples of purely natural monologue Because be durn if there ain t something about a durn fellow like Anse that seems to make a man have to help him, even when he knows he ll be wanting to kick himself the next minute.And Sometimes I think it aint none of us pure crazy and aint none of us pure sane until the balance of us talks him that a way It s like it aint so much what a fellow does, but it s the way the majority of folks is looking at him when he does it But here s an example of Faulkner s own voice breaking in The narrator here is Vardaman, aged around ten I can cry quiet now, feeling and hearing my tears It is dark I can hear wood, silence I know them But not living sounds, not even him It is as though the dark were resolving him out of his integrity into an unrelated scattering of componentsThe last sentence is not Vardaman It s Faulkner Here s the daughter Dewey Dell her usual mode is like this About his head the print of his hat sweated into his hair His shirt is blotched with sweat He has not washed his hands and arms But then The cow breathes upon my hips and back, her breath warm, sweet, stertorous, moaningeven my spellcheck does not know stertorous, much less an uneducated 17 year old country girl So what is Faulkner doing here Messing with us readers, I think And now, here s Darl, one of the sons Now as this family is the purely uneducated rural poor, how is it one of their sons the one who narrates about half of the book thinks in this lushly textured poetic and highly intellectual language He looks up at the gaunt face framed by the window in the twilight It is a composite picture of all time since he was a child For a while, still, she looks down at him from the composite picture, neither with censure nor approbation Then she flings herself across Addie Bundren s knees, clutching her, shaking her with the furious strength of the young before sprawling suddenly across the handful of rotten bones that Addie Bundren left, jarring the whole bed into a chattering sibilance of mattress shucks, her arms outflung and the fan in one hand still beating with expiring breath into the quilt.She looks down at the face It is like a casting of fading bronze upon the pillow, the hands alone still with any semblance of life a curled, gnarled inertness a spent yet alert quality from which weariness, exhaustion, travail has not yet departed, as though they doubted even yet the actuality of rest, guarding with horned and penurious alertness the cessation which they know cannot last Check out these examples of Darl s vocabulary We go on with a motion so soporific, so dreamlike as to be uninferant of progress, as though time and not space were decreasing between us and it How do our lives ravel out into the no wind, no sound, the weary gestures wearily recapitulantA cubistic bugStarkly re accruentDon t sound like no poor white trash I ever came acrost, dunt know about you Soundslike Marcel damn Proust than Hank Williams Shoot, soundslike this William Faulkner hisself talkin Seems he didn t want to write no normal book but one a them whatchacallem modernist efforts but like he jes couldnt hep hisself had to git that thar poetic jawbreakin stuff in there someways n so turned one a his ole country boys into some kinda god damn genius It doesn t really work, a few pages of Darl and my suspension of disbelief came crashing down and really bruised my left shoulder, I can still feel it now And there s another thing about old Darl He frequently launches off into Deep Space, like this I don t know what I am I don t know if I am or not Jewel knows he is, because he does not know that he does not know whether he is or not He cannot empty himself for sleep because he is not what he is and he is what he is not I had to look round and ask here, who let Samuel Beckett in here Even so, and also taking into consideration a couple of apparent plot holes in the rather too neat O Henryish ending how did bumbling Anse fix up all that in such a short space of time I still loved the bravery and confidence of this novel It ramified my brain, and there is hardly any higher praise It was great 4.5 stars


  7. Alex Alex says:

    Many of us slogged through this unofficial My First Faulkner in high school, and probably all any of us remember from it is Vardaman s line, My mother is a fish, which our teachers used to teach us about Foreshadowing For many of us this would be My Last Faulkner too because we learned mostly that Faulkner is a fucking pain in the ass At least it s less confusing than The Sound The Fury, although that s sortof like saying a given animal is less dangerous than a bear strapped to a shark ok Many of us slogged through this unofficial My First Faulkner in high school, and probably all any of us remember from it is Vardaman s line, My mother is a fish, which our teachers used to teach us about Foreshadowing For many of us this would be My Last Faulkner too because we learned mostly that Faulkner is a fucking pain in the ass At least it s less confusing than The Sound The Fury, although that s sortof like saying a given animal is less dangerous than a bear strapped to a shark okay, but there s a long way between that and safe.Faulkner is a pain in the ass because he was a modernist one of the Three Great Modernists, along with Woolf and Joyce, and modernism is when you jumble up your timelines and perspectives and generally just obfuscate everything so it s about all a body can do to figure out what the plot even is, and while all three of these authors are great, in that they know what they re doing and they re memorable and they re telling great truths, they are also massive pains in your ass and should basically not be read by most people.But you canor less follow most of the plot in this book, and here s what it is this shambling backwoods family of future Trump voters sets off to bury the matriarch on her family land, and they fuck it all up The plot has the grinding inevitability of great tragedy, but the events have an obstinately small scale it s just these idiots, trying to get a coffin across a river.Here are the characters Addie Bundren, the one who dies Anse, her lazy good for nothing husband, who looks like a figure carved clumsily from tough wood by a drunken caricaturist, a description that Cormac McCarthy would build basically his entire career on Cash, the carpenter eldest son who never finishes a sentence even in his head Darl, who for some reason doubles as an omniscient narrator, the most articulate of the group, considered queer for that very reason remember that scene in Idiocracy where the dude gets diagnosed with talking like a fag and constantly babbling about is and was like a college kid getting stoned for the third time Jewel, the horse obsessed son whose eyes are constantly described, like pieces of a broken plate, which no they aren t, that s simply not what eyes are like Dewey Dell, the sole daughter, whose wet dress shapes for the blind eyes of three blind men those mammalian ludicrosities which are the horizons and the valleys of the earth in the single worst description of breasts ever perpetrated to paper Vardaman of the fish, who is off in some vague way Faulkner has never been particularly specific about his medical diagnoses Benjy from Sound The Fury is also non diagnosably off he might be autistic, who knows Vardaman is either in his early teens and off my position or around 8 and less off There s conflicting evidence.Faulkner sortof recycles some of his characters from Sound the Fury, written just a year earlier in 1929 Benjy and Vardaman are both fucked in the head Dewey Dell and Caddy are the underdressed daughters Darl and Quentin are the time obsessed poets They also share a setting, Faulkner s famous and made up Yoknapatawpha County in Mississippi Mississippi might be real, how would I know Sound the Fury didn t sell well, and Faulkner aimed deliberately to write a tour de force,a surefire winner, whichor less worked out He claims to have written it in six weeks and one draft.There are a few other characters, most notably thefunctional neighbors Vernon and Cora Tull Everybody takes turns narrating each has a distinct voice, but all of them use words they couldn t possibly have any excuse to know Here s young Vardaman s description of a horse It is as though the dark were resolving him out of his integrity, into an unrelated scattering of components snuffings and stampings, smells of cooling flesh and ammoniac hair, an uncoordinated whole of splotched hide and strong bones within which, detached and secret and familiar, an is different from my is. Faulkner s not even trying to make anyone talk realistically He s about something, I guess lending epic weight to lifesize events and I even kinda like it but it s still basically ridiculous.I m making fun of Faulkner a lot, which is easy and fun to do because he s a jackass, but I like this book The river crossing is genuinely exciting Faulkner s kinda funny, in sortof a check out this sentence I m about to get away with, fuck all of you way not as funny as his fellow Southern Gothic Flannery O Connor, but who is The book overall walks a line between complicated and understandable, and for once Faulkner stays on the right side of it.Over the course of the book, most of the family have their own stories to play out It s surprising and neat new dimensions keep unfolding We learn that Jewel view spoiler is illegitimate, by Rev Whitfield this is the most obfuscated plot development hide spoiler Dewey Dell what kind of fuckin name is that view spoiler has been knocked up and is trying to get a secret abortion, which ends in her beingor less raped hide spoiler Darl view spoiler burns a barn down, because this is after all a Gothic, and gets sold out by his family and sent to an asylum hide spoiler Even dumb old Anse view spoiler surprise marries some duck shaped lady hide spoiler He also view spoiler spends Dewey Dell s abortion money on new teeth and a graphophone, which is a kind of early record player similar to the gramophone but instead of records they played these wax cylinders, sortof like what you see in a player piano hide spoiler.I m not the world s biggest Faulkner fan Of the modernists, Woolf is by far my favorite of the writers in general, the modernists are among my least favorite, because for fuck s sake just write down what s happening, if I wanted a puzzle I d do a crossword I generally wouldn t recommend that anyone read Faulkner unless they re just dying to for some reason, and in that case one should maybe ask oneself what that reason could possibly be, and is one really making good life choices here, and is one crazy, and is one possibly a pretentious dickwad, and wouldn t one honestly be better off just watching TV Says the guy who was just dying to read Faulkner like a week ago, and now I ve gone and done it and I kinda thought it was great I don t know, man I aint so sho who s got ere a right to say when a man is crazy and when he aint Sometimes I think it aint none of us pure crazy and aint none of us pure sane until the balance of us talks him that a way It s like it aint so much what a fellow does, but it s the way the majority of folks is looking at him when he does it.Don t look at me


  8. Lyn Lyn says:

    My mother is a fish Faulkner s short novel about a rural family following the death of their matriarch Funny, disturbing, maddening, thought provoking, and mysterious I have never been a big fan of stream of consciousness thus I have never finished The Sound and the Fury and Faulkner does well to limit that technique here He does employ multiple narrators, varying perspectives, themes and an eclectic narration I cannot help thinking this is a thin, minimalistic American version of War a My mother is a fish Faulkner s short novel about a rural family following the death of their matriarch Funny, disturbing, maddening, thought provoking, and mysterious I have never been a big fan of stream of consciousness thus I have never finished The Sound and the Fury and Faulkner does well to limit that technique here He does employ multiple narrators, varying perspectives, themes and an eclectic narration I cannot help thinking this is a thin, minimalistic American version of War and Peace


  9. Fabian Fabian says:

    This thrilling, chilling tale is told through a sort of schizm The conglomeration of different consciousnesses is a bubbling soup mixed in with dark symbols this prose palpitates This is waayyyaccessible than, say, The Sound and the Fury and for those who have strayed away from this darling writer, this particular masterpiece will immediately put him or her in Faulkner This thrilling, chilling tale is told through a sort of schizm The conglomeration of different consciousnesses is a bubbling soup mixed in with dark symbols Southern Gothic elements, and it is indeed a delightful experience, an overly delicious dish The macabre is Alive this prose palpitates This is waayyyaccessible than, say, The Sound and the Fury and for those who have strayed away from this darling writer, this particular masterpiece will immediately put him or her in Faulkner s direct sphere of influence he she will swim in that dark, twisted atmosphere, bask in it for some long while Read this and you will know what Faulkner his deep, haunted, tortured South are all about.The Best Willy Faulkner book


  10. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    As I Lay Dying, William FaulknerAs I Lay Dying is a 1930 novel, in the genre of Southern Gothic, by American author William Faulkner Faulkner said that he wrote the novel from midnight to 4 00 AM over the course of six weeks and that he did not change a word of it Faulkner wrote it while working at a power plant, published it in 1930, and described it as a tour de force Faulkner s fifth novel, it is consistently ranked among the best novels of 20th century literature The title derives from As I Lay Dying, William FaulknerAs I Lay Dying is a 1930 novel, in the genre of Southern Gothic, by American author William Faulkner Faulkner said that he wrote the novel from midnight to 4 00 AM over the course of six weeks and that he did not change a word of it Faulkner wrote it while working at a power plant, published it in 1930, and described it as a tour de force Faulkner s fifth novel, it is consistently ranked among the best novels of 20th century literature The title derives from Book XI of Homer s Odyssey, wherein Agamemnon tells Odysseus As I lay dying, the woman with the dog s eyes would not close my eyes as I descended into Hades The book is narrated by 15 different characters over 51 chapters It is the story of the death of Addie Bundren and her poor, rural family s quest and motivations noble or selfish to honor her wish to be buried in her hometown of Jefferson, Mississippi As the book opens, Addie is alive, though in ill health Addie and others expect her to die soon, and she sits at a window watching as her firstborn, Cash, builds her coffin Anse, Addie s husband, waits on the porch, while their daughter, Dewey Dell, fans her mother in the July heat The night after Addie dies a heavy rainstorm sets in rivers rise and wash out bridges the family will need to cross to get to Jefferson The family s trek by wagon begins, with Addie s non embalmed body in the coffin Along the way, Anse and the five children encounter various difficulties Anse frequently rejects any offers of assistance, including meals or lodging, so at times the family goes hungry and sleeps in barns At other times he refuses to accept loans from people, claiming he wishes to be beholden to no man , thus manipulating the would be lender into giving him charity as a gift not to be repaid Jewel, Addie s middle child, tries to leave his dysfunctional family, yet cannot turn his back on them through the trials Cash breaks a leg and winds up riding atop the coffin He refuses to admit to any discomfort, but the family eventually puts a makeshift cast of concrete on his leg Twice, the family almost loses Addie s coffin first, while crossing a river on a washed out bridge two mules are lost , and second, when a fire of suspicious origin starts in the barn where the coffin is being stored for a night After nine days, the family finally arrives in Jefferson, where the stench from the coffin is quickly smelled by the townspeople In town, family members have different items of business to take care of Cash s broken leg needs attention Dewey Dell, for the second time in the novel, goes to a pharmacy, trying to obtain an abortion that she does not know how to ask for First, though, Anse wants to borrow some shovels to bury Addie, because that was the purpose of the trip and the family should be together for that Before that happens, however, Darl, the second eldest, is seized for the arson of the barn and sent to the Mississippi State Insane Asylum in Jackson With Addie only just buried, Anse forces Dewey Dell to give up her money, which he spends on getting new teeth , and marries the woman from whom he borrowed the spades 1994 1371 250 1382 9643621936 1386 9789643621933 1387 1389 1391 304 1393 20 1930


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Döşeğimde Ölürken❮Reading❯ ➹ Döşeğimde Ölürken ➱ Author William Faulkner – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk y zy l n b y k modernist romanc lar ndan William Faulkner n yaz m tekni inde radikal bir yenili i temsil eden, benzersiz bir yap t l m d e inde olan Addie, k rk mil uzakl ktaki Jefferson mezarl na, a y zy l n b y k modernist romanc lar ndan William Faulkner n yaz m tekni inde radikal bir yenili i temsil eden, benzersiz bir yap t l m d e inde olan Addie, k rk mil uzakl ktaki Jefferson mezarl na, ailesinin yan na g m lmeyi vasiyet eder Addie nin tabutunu bir kat r arabas na y kleyen Bundren ailesi, s cakla ve sellerle bo u acaklar uzun bir yolculu a kar D e imde l rken, on be farkl anlat c n n a z ndan anlat lan elli dokuz b l mden olu ur Ailenin fke, z nt , endi e ve tutku dolu ser veni karakterlerin zihninden ge en ak n ritmiyle birle ir Bilin lilik ak tekni ini arp c bir yetkinlikle kullanan Faulkner n karakterlerinin g zleriyle sesi kendi i ine d n p a lay n dinlemeye koyulmu gibidir D zyaz y iirselle tirmekte s rad bir yetene i olan Faulkner n bu roman , sezgilerin, duyarl klar n, i seslerin, bo luklar n destan d r D e imde l rken in bir Amerikal taraf ndan yaz lm en zg n roman oldu u s ylenebilir Faulkner,y zy l n en b y k romanc lar aras nda Harold Bloom.


About the Author: William Faulkner

William Cuthbert Faulkner was a Nobel Prize winning American novelist and short story writer One of the most influential writers of the twentieth century, his reputation is based mostly on his novels, novellas, and short stories He was also a published poet and an occasional screenwriterThe majority of his works are set in his native state of Mississippi Though his work was published as early as , and largely during the s and s, Faulkner was relatively unknown until receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature, for his powerful and artistically unique contribution to the modern American novel Faulkner has often been cited as one of the most important writers in the history of American literature Faulkner was influenced by European modernism, and employed stream of consciousness in several of his novels.