A Strangeness in My Mind PDF º in My ePUB ´ A


10 thoughts on “A Strangeness in My Mind

  1. Elyse Walters Elyse Walters says:

    The Museum of Innocence , by Orhan Pamuk, was one of the most nail biting intense stories of a wealthy man s obsession for a shopgirl in Istanbul I had ever read.One hell of an amazing 600 page novel Magnificent A Strangeness in my Mind is also magnificent brilliant deliciously enjoyable I lost myself through the eyes of Pamuks s protagonist seeking balance between the past and the present The story begins when an elopement goes wrong for Mevlut, a street vendor, living in Ist The Museum of Innocence , by Orhan Pamuk, was one of the most nail biting intense stories of a wealthy man s obsession for a shopgirl in Istanbul I had ever read.One hell of an amazing 600 page novel Magnificent A Strangeness in my Mind is also magnificent brilliant deliciously enjoyable I lost myself through the eyes of Pamuks s protagonist seeking balance between the past and the present The story begins when an elopement goes wrong for Mevlut, a street vendor, living in Istanbul since the age of twelve He returns to his native Anatolia to meet his beloved Rayiha Arrangements have been made for them to run away together Mevlut has glimpsed her just once, wearing a headscarf, at a wedding Since then, he s written her hundreds of love letters for three years praising her beauty and eyes After making his getaway with his cousin, Suleyman driving, during the darkest of nights, Mevlut realizes his bride to be is actually the older homelier sister Being an honorable man, he makes peace with the situation and marries her Mevlut was tricked by Suleyman who wants the younger, pretty Samiha for himself Throughout the novel Mevlut senses a disconnect between self and the world and his lifelong efforts to harmonize the two Mevlut remains poor, working a variety of jobs while watching his initial vocation as a street vendor selling yogurt and boza, a Turkish drink, disappear Mevlut walks at night trying to sell his boza Melancholy sets in Walking fueled his imagination and reminded him that there was another realm within our world, hidden away There s many other characters who tell Melvut s unfolding story wonderful texture characters but this is Melvut s story He uses his imagination to revise the past and make peace with the present You gotta love this honorable, humble man selling boza Orphan Pamuk Winner of the Nobel Prize Juicy storyteller


  2. Aleks Aleks says:

    Well, after three weeks of reading I finally finished Orhan Pamuk s latest novel Kafamda Bir Tuhafl k , probably the best book I have read so far in this year Not only that the novel is, in Pamuk s recognizable way, a rather thick volume, reading it also coincided with general renovation of my flat btw, great way to spend summer , so I had a very little time to dedicate to the book Nonetheless, I kept going and found out that reading of this novel not just fulfilled me in the way that good b Well, after three weeks of reading I finally finished Orhan Pamuk s latest novel Kafamda Bir Tuhafl k , probably the best book I have read so far in this year Not only that the novel is, in Pamuk s recognizable way, a rather thick volume, reading it also coincided with general renovation of my flat btw, great way to spend summer , so I had a very little time to dedicate to the book Nonetheless, I kept going and found out that reading of this novel not just fulfilled me in the way that good books often do but also made me calm and relaxed, and because of that gave me a much needed rest from the general fatigue.Previously, I wasn t impressed by Pamuk s Masumiyet M zesi The Museum of Innocence , the first novel that came out after he received the Nobel prize I thought that it had much to do with the award itself because it seemed to me that authors tend to publish somewhat lesser work after the Nobel Perhaps a memoir or autobiography although Pamuk s already done that with the remarkable Istanbul something to sum up their work and their life After the award, very rarely one produces a masterpiece that can compare with his greatest achievements produced during the peak of his vitality.But I was wrong Pamuk s latest novel, in my opinion, is by far his best novel and I ve read almost all of them.Although the novel s main character is a poor boza street salesman, this book which is the greatest of all Pamuk s virtue and virtuosity talks mostly about Istanbul, the city itself Like in some of his previous works, Istanbul becomes very much alive, almost like a human itself Pamuk s love for his birthplace is undeniable, and he continuously proves that with every novel that he writes.In that sense, Kafamda Bir Tuhafl k presents a history of Istanbul through main character, Mevlut Karatas, from 1969 to the 2012 Through that period, Istanbul changed in many ways most of these ways were rather insurrectionary and evidently, that continuous to happen today in cultural, societal and identity aspects The novel has everything historical background, love story, social and cultural turbulences, multi vocal narration and, most of all, incredible tableau of city of Istanbul.Finally, I must thank the publishing house Geopoetika for the first world translation of this novel, and also recommend everybody to read it when it becomes translated in other languages And if you befall to renovate your house or apartment while accidentally picking up Kafamda Bir Tuhafl k to read, just do what I did after I d finished job for that day just drop by the local delicatessen shop and refresh yourself with a glass of iced boza


  3. Hugh Hugh says:

    There is something rather old fashioned but charming about this sprawling, languorous family story set in Istanbul over 40 years The central character Mevlut is a poor street trader who supplements various day jobs by spending his evenings selling boza a traditional slightly alcoholic drink on the streets This represents something of a departure for Pamuk whose previous books have been set among the city s richer elite This one also allowsspace to its female characters.The first two There is something rather old fashioned but charming about this sprawling, languorous family story set in Istanbul over 40 years The central character Mevlut is a poor street trader who supplements various day jobs by spending his evenings selling boza a traditional slightly alcoholic drink on the streets This represents something of a departure for Pamuk whose previous books have been set among the city s richer elite This one also allowsspace to its female characters.The first two chapters are out of sequence the first covers the night when Mevlut elopes with his wife Rayiha He has been writing to Rayiha since seeing her sister at a family wedding his cousin Suleyman has tricked him into addressing the letters to the wrong sister, but it soon becomes clear that Rayiha is the better match The second chapter is many years later as Mevlut suffers a crisis of confidence after being robbed by ruthless street thieves The rest of the book is told in chronological order, starting when Mevlut arrives in the city as a boy to help his father in his yogurt and boza selling business.The real subject of the book is the city itself Pamuk chronicles its expansion, modernisation, political and sociological changes in great detail The incorruptible but poor Mevlut is contrasted with his scheming and richer cousins For such a long book, this is a surprisingly easy read the story telling always keeps you interested despite the mundane nature of much of the story A pleasure to read


  4. T.D. Whittle T.D. Whittle says:

    I can only meditate when I am walking When I stop, I cease to think my mind works only with my legs Jean Jacques Rousseau I will sell boza until the day the world ends Mevlut Karatas p 584 This book is long and meandering, its power like that of a fire built slowly from a bit of kindling and a single spark From the beginning, it is carefully tended and coaxed along in a quiet but steady fashion until Whoosh , it ignites in full glory A Strangeness in My Mind did not particularly grab I can only meditate when I am walking When I stop, I cease to think my mind works only with my legs Jean Jacques Rousseau I will sell boza until the day the world ends Mevlut Karatas p 584 This book is long and meandering, its power like that of a fire built slowly from a bit of kindling and a single spark From the beginning, it is carefully tended and coaxed along in a quiet but steady fashion until Whoosh , it ignites in full glory A Strangeness in My Mind did not particularly grab me, in a dramatic sense, with its opening but it did interest me enough to keep going It begins with the protagonist, Mevlut, a boza seller, and his fiancee, Rayiha, running away to elope I liked Melvut and Rayiha, so I kept reading, all the while thinking that, yes, it is good I am not loving it, but neither do I want to abandon it We follow Mevlut s life from the time he is a boy of twelve until he is a man of fifty five The narrative structure is mostly linear, though there is a bit of slipping back and forth in time There are a lot of characters in this book but I did not find them hard to keep track of However, should you get lost, the author has provided a family tree at the beginning of the book and a character index and chronology at the end.I felt bogged down in the years when Mevlut was an adolescent living alone with his father on the outskirts of the city, failing at his all boys school, working as a street vendor, semi stalking women he was obsessed with, and masturbating nonstop Then, when Mevlut enters his mandatory military service, the book remains very male focused, dominated by their interests, their dialogue, and their competitive struggles Basically, these pages wreak of testosterone and musky sweat As a woman reader, this bored me, I have to admit I read a lot of books written by men, but I like the women and girls to be involved or I simply can t connect Having said that, I did love wandering with Mevlut through Istanbul and hearing about the changes the city was undergoing over the years And what happened over the course of the narrative is that my sense of intimacy with Mevlut and with Istanbul grew closer, insidiously, so that by the end I was shedding tears and felt a deep sympathy with him Mevlut is within the city but the city is also within Mevlut It is also a dynamic symbol of the tumultuous lives of impoverished Turkish families Their fates and sorrows are intertwined.So this is how Mevlut came to understand the truth that a part of him had known all along walking around the city at night made him feel as if he were wandering around in his own head That was why whenever he spoke to the walls, advertisements, shadows, and strange and mysterious shapes he couldn t see in the night, he always felt as if he were talking to himself p 579 I cannot escape my impression that, if one were to put a gender to Istabul, it would be a woman a grand and beautiful dowager who has been roughly treated but maintains her dignity and grace nevertheless This is how the women in the book are presented, too Though not all are roughly treated, they all have difficult lives, made all thedifficult by living in an oppressive patriarchy and struggling at various time with grinding poverty and lack of proper reproductive healthcare In this way, I came to feel that Mevlut loved three women deeply and passionately during his lifetime first, his crush, Samiha then, his wife, Rayiha and, from the age of twelive, his adopted city, Istanbul.But just like believing in God, falling in love is such a sacred feeling that it leaves you with no room for any other passions.By about halfway through A Strangeness had hooked me I realised how completely invested I had become in the characters well being I had not felt terribly attached to Melvut before then and, really, it was the women becomingof a presence in the book that made it take off for me Melvut s wife, Rayiha, their daughters, and Rayiha s sisters Over six hundred pages, I fell in love with Melvut, Rayiha, their girls, the girls aunties, and the rampaged and rambling sprawl of old Istanbul These are very ordinary people, with ordinary lives, but the story of these lives is rich and proves the point that no one s story is boring if you attend closely enough to the telling Pamuk is masterful in the telling, but it s a subtle mastery He does not bash you over the head with bigness The dramas, while intense and worrying, are not over played There are deaths, even one murder, but the details given are only enough to tell us that these things happened Nothing gratuitous I appreciate Pamuk s discretion and feel that his choices of when to zoom in and out of focus are near perfect.I am reflecting on the aftertaste of A Strangeness in My Mind, thinking that it s probably a lot like boza nostalgic, sweet, and just a bit sour, all at the same time No, I m not joking Boza is holy, said Mevlut I m a Muslim, said Suleyman Only things that obey the rules of my faith can be holy Just because something isn t strictly Islamic doesn t mean it can t be holy Old things we ve inherited from our ancestors can be holy, too, said Mevlut When I m out at night on the gloomy, empty streets, I sometimes come across a mossy old wall A wonderful joy rises up inside me I walk into the cemetery, and even though I can t read the Arabic script on the gravestones, I still feel as good as I would if I d prayed p 271 Two desires that will linger with me now are to wander aimlessly through the nighttime streets of Istanbul and to try boza for myself Pamuk is a beautiful writer I am looking forward toof his books Note For this reason, although I enjoy fantasy, I did not enjoy The Lord of the Rings, in which females are icons on pedestals rather than playing an active role, or Moby Dick or, The Whale, or Das Boot, in which females have no place at all I did like watching the films of Lord of the Rings though because they were spectacularly made I was swept away by the awesome visuals.Click on the following images to see the full version They appear squashed unless you do that Istanbul painted by Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky 1817 1900 Istanbul painted by Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky 1817 1900


  5. Emma Emma says:

    It is such a cliche to say that I got lost in the story but if any novel should get this pronouncement from me, this is it As always, Pamuk writes with a beauty and love for his native Istanbul yet he is not one to show the city through a rose tinted lens The same goes for the people he potrays Stylistically, the ever increasing build up of detail creates a set of characters and a sense of place that you, the reader, come to know intimately Not only are you welcomed in to this world whic It is such a cliche to say that I got lost in the story but if any novel should get this pronouncement from me, this is it As always, Pamuk writes with a beauty and love for his native Istanbul yet he is not one to show the city through a rose tinted lens The same goes for the people he potrays Stylistically, the ever increasing build up of detail creates a set of characters and a sense of place that you, the reader, come to know intimately Not only are you welcomed in to this world which, for me, is so very different from my own , you become part of it You see, hear, and smell the city I know, and understand, Mevlut better than some of my friends and family For this reason, the book can be exhausing it took me two months to read , but it is also magical However, if you are new to Pamuk, I wouldn t start here For me, none of his works can eclipse My Name is Red and I always recommend it.Many thanks to Orhan Pamuk, Faber and Faber, and Netgalley for this copy in exchange for an honest review


  6. Antonomasia Antonomasia says:

    Among my started but not finished books, this now squats like Larkin s toad, work and I think it s time to declare it abandoned, at 61% It s not bad, I don t 100% rule out returning to it, but this self imposed obligation needs to be sacked off in favour ofenticing reads Faster readers, and thosein the habit of reading 600pp novels, seem unlikely to find this an issue, especially when one considers the high 4.06 average Goodreads rating Mevlut the Boza Seller as I ve no idea w Among my started but not finished books, this now squats like Larkin s toad, work and I think it s time to declare it abandoned, at 61% It s not bad, I don t 100% rule out returning to it, but this self imposed obligation needs to be sacked off in favour ofenticing reads Faster readers, and thosein the habit of reading 600pp novels, seem unlikely to find this an issue, especially when one considers the high 4.06 average Goodreads rating Mevlut the Boza Seller as I ve no idea why the publishers didn t title it in English, evoking its 19th century novel ethos, and telling the readerfactually what the book is about Mevlut, for all that he wonders about his own thoughts, being one of the least strange minded characters one might encounter in the world of arty weirdos that populates literary fiction seems pretty great for giving a panorama of how political and religious changes have affected the lives of working people in Istanbul over the last several decades, and for its concentration on working class life without seeking to romanticise it, or treat it as a mere obstacle or starting gun for characters destined for a life withmoney andtime to spend reading novels like this one Millions of people live their whole lives similarly to Mevlut and his family, and contemporary fiction usually ignores them And if you are ever prone to feeling a tad resentful when you pick up a novel, because your life isn t one of endless years safely lolling about painting or writing and visiting friends, and spending quite freely unlike so many literary characters this book may make a welcome change expending your reading time with people who also have to get up every morning for hard graft, and who still can t afford very much The first perhaps third or so of the novel was great There is something very measured about the writing carry water and chop wood But not hermitically so this is also realist real life with other emotions and events Mevlut is a very decent guy but also not a saint As the novel wore on, though, it seemed to alternate between too much detail and not enough Events were summarised too dully, I d notice when returning to Strangeness after other books Scenes weren t so alive The issue was not what was happening, very much not but how it was told I d still like to know how successive governments and increasing Islamicisation affect the characters for the rest of the story but if only it could be summarised in 50 pages or soI ve littleto say about this book, except to link to the best commentaries on it I ve seen, from Jibran in discussion threads here and here, and Lee in a blog post here


  7. Kyriakos Sorokkou Kyriakos Sorokkou says:

    As always Pamuk never disappoints.Another incredible book by Turkish Nobel Prize Winner 2006 Orhan Pamuk.My 5th book by Pamuk.My 4th novel by him since I read his Memoirs from Istanbul a non fiction book, part memoir part biography of his beautiful birthplace.This novel like most of Pamuk s novels, takes place in Istanbul this time between 1969 2012 It tells us the simple story of a simple man from Central Anatolia called Mevlut Karata that came to Istanbul with his father in 1969 to beco As always Pamuk never disappoints.Another incredible book by Turkish Nobel Prize Winner 2006 Orhan Pamuk.My 5th book by Pamuk.My 4th novel by him since I read his Memoirs from Istanbul a non fiction book, part memoir part biography of his beautiful birthplace.This novel like most of Pamuk s novels, takes place in Istanbul this time between 1969 2012 It tells us the simple story of a simple man from Central Anatolia called Mevlut Karata that came to Istanbul with his father in 1969 to become a boza seller.Boza is a fermented beverage made from fermented wheat and it has a creamy thick consistency.The story might not be something extraordinary but Pamuk s writing and the way he structures the book makes it extraordinary.This book is divided in seven parts.Parts 1 and 2 are two different days in the life of Mevlut when something important happened.Part 1 takes place on Thursday, 17 June 1982 and Part 2 on Wednesday, 30 March 1994.Then in Parts 3, 4, and 5 which are the main bulk of the book we are taken back in the beginning of his life in Istanbul 1969 and we slowly slowly reach the important moments that happened in Parts 1 and 2.Now Parts 6 and 7 work as mini epilogues and is where we see a conclusion of Mevlut s story in the book.Part 6 takes place on Wednesday, 15 April 2009, and Part 7 on Thursday, 25 October 2012.Another interesting thing of the way this book is structured is the narration We have Mevlut s parts told in 3rd person narration and we also have 13 characters that tell us their own story in 1st person narration All these characters are his friends, his family, and people from his close environment.So on the one hand we see Mevlut s story from above with the help of an omnipresent narrator 3rd person and from the other hand his story from 13 different points of view, that sometimes leave the main storyline Mevlut and are concentrated on their own story.We see on the one hand Mevlut s life but through his life we are also able to see the history of modern Turkey.This novel also has characteristics from Dickens realism and also from the picaresque novels of the 18th century This is because the subtitle and the first paragraph of the book are the whole story in other words spoilers But as Pamuk said in an interview good literature isn t concerned by spoilers and what is going to happen in the end but the actual journey not the destination The book like many Pamuk books includes also an index of characters and a Chronology of events.Now before I leave you I ll put here the Title the Subtitle and the first paragraph of the book A Strangeness in My Mind Being the Adventures and Dreams of Mevlut Karata , a seller of Boza, and his friends, and also a portrait of Life in Istanbul Between 1969 and 2012 from Many Different Points of View This is the story of the life and daydreams of Mevlut Karata a seller of boza and yogurt Born in 1957 on the western edge of Asia, in a poor village overlooking a hazy lake in Central Anatolia, he came to Istanbul at the age of twelve, living there, in the capital of the world, for the rest of his life When he was twenty five, he returned to the province of his birth, where he eloped with a village girl, a rather strange affair that determined the rest of his days returning with her to Istanbul, he got married and had two daughters he took a number of jobs without pause, selling his yogurt, ice cream, and rice in the street and waiting tables But every evening, without fail, he would wander the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and dreaming strange dreams.You can see Pamuk s interview on this book here a one hour interview I watched twice yes I enjoy listening to him I can t hide it any


  8. Irmak Ertuna-howison Irmak Ertuna-howison says:

    some say a bourgeois cannot write about the poor poverty i say you don t know literature some say a bourgeois cannot write about the poor poverty i say you don t know literature


  9. Usman Hickmath Usman Hickmath says:

    Brilliant work from Pamuk He has told the story of a street vendor taking almost 600 pages while maintaining the readability and have discussed issues such as poverty, struggle of middle class women, illegal construction, and Capitalist, Marxist and Islamist divide in the backdrop of a fallen empire Have a look at this piece to understand the universality of issues elaborated in the novel The enterprising individual who built a house on an empty lot would plant a few poplars and willow trees a Brilliant work from Pamuk He has told the story of a street vendor taking almost 600 pages while maintaining the readability and have discussed issues such as poverty, struggle of middle class women, illegal construction, and Capitalist, Marxist and Islamist divide in the backdrop of a fallen empire Have a look at this piece to understand the universality of issues elaborated in the novel The enterprising individual who built a house on an empty lot would plant a few poplars and willow trees and lay the first few bricks of a wall to mark out his property, after which he would go to the neighborhood council man and pay him something to draw up a document certifying that said individual had built the house in question and planted those trees himself Just like the genuine title deed issued by the State Land Registry, these documents included a crude plan of the house, which the councilman himself would draw with a pencil and a ruler He would jot down some additional notations in his childish scrawl the adjacent plots belonging to this or that person, nearby fountain, the locations of the wall which in fact might have consisted of nothan a rock or two here and there , and the poplar trees and if you gave him some extra money, he would add a couple of words to widen the imaginary boundaries of the plot, before finally affixing his seal underneath it all. In reality, the land belonged to the national Treasury or to the forestry department, so the documents provided by the councilman did not guarantee ownership at all A house built on unregistered land could be knocked down by the authorities at any moment Sleeping for the first time in the homers they d built with their own hands, people would often have nightmares about this potential disaster But the value of councilman s document would prove itself when the government decided, as it tended to do every decade or so in election years, to issue title deeds for homes built overnight for these deeds be handed out in conformity with the documents drawn up by the local councilman Further, anyone who was able to procure a document from the councilman certifying ownership of a plot of land could then sell that plot to someone else During periods when the flow of unemployed and homeless immigrants to the city was particularly heavy, the price of these documents would rise, with the increasingly valuable plots quickly split up and parceled out, and the political influence of the councilman, needless to say, also climbing in proportion to the influx of migrants.


  10. Lindz Lindz says:

    It has been awhile since I fell in love, I mean really fallen in love Reading this was like reading 1Q84 or Wise Children or even Harry Potter for the first time Every single colour and flavour suddenly springs up through your brain chemistry All the usual cliches I empathized and adored every single character, I wish it was another 500 pages, I was sad and to be honest a bitthan a tad hung over closing the final page How can even attempt to move on to another book For ten minutes I It has been awhile since I fell in love, I mean really fallen in love Reading this was like reading 1Q84 or Wise Children or even Harry Potter for the first time Every single colour and flavour suddenly springs up through your brain chemistry All the usual cliches I empathized and adored every single character, I wish it was another 500 pages, I was sad and to be honest a bitthan a tad hung over closing the final page How can even attempt to move on to another book For ten minutes I would be inconsolable, then I would around for another clone , er book and I would be fine.I am the complete mark for this book I love urban centred narratives by nature, there is certain buzz to a city that I find intoxicating and you cannot get buzzierchaotic andurban than Istanbul Pamuk writes literary about the city from the perspective of those who keep it buzzing long the street venders, shop owners, inspectors, cleaners, builders There is so muchI could gush over, the different perspectives structured in such a gossipy way that they characters could only be family, how Pamuk dolled out small pieces of information about Istanbul itself or noting the passage of time or just his writing in general I am just gushing all over the place


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A Strangeness in My Mind [Reading] ➶ A Strangeness in My Mind By Orhan Pamuk – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk From the Nobel Prize winner and best selling author of Snow and My Name Is Red a soaring, panoramic new novel his first since The Museum of Innocence telling the unforgettable tale of an Istanbul stre From the Nobel Prize winner and in My ePUB ´ best selling author of Snow and My Name Is Red a soaring, panoramic new novel his first since The Museum of Innocence telling the unforgettable tale of an Istanbul street A Strangeness PDF or vendor and the love of his life Since his boyhood in a poor village in Central Anatolia, Mevlut Karata has fantasized about what his life would become Not getting as far in school as he d hoped, Strangeness in My MOBI ï at the age of twelve he comes to Istanbul the center of the world and is immediately enthralled by both the old city that is disappearing and the new one that is fast being built He follows his father s trade, selling boza a traditional mildly alcoholic Turkish drink on the street, and hoping to become rich, like other villagers who have settled the desolate hills outside the booming metropolis But luck never seems to be on Mevlut s side As he watches his relations settle down and make their fortunes, he spends three years writing love letters to a girl he saw just once at a wedding, only to elope by mistake with her sister And though he grows to cherish his wife and the family they have, he stumbles toward middle age in a series of jobs leading nowhere His sense of missing something leads him sometimes to the politics of his friends and intermittently to the teachings of a charismatic religious guide But every evening, without fail, Mevlut still wanders the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and wondering at the strangeness in his mind, the sensation that makes him feel different from everyone else, until fortune conspires once to let him understand at last what it is he has always yearned forTold from different perspectives by a host of beguiling characters, A Strangeness in My Mind is a modern epic of coming of age in a great city, a brilliant tableau of life among the newcomers who have changed the face of Istanbul over the past fifty years Here is a mesmerizing story of human longing, sure to take its place among Pamuk s finest achievements.

    A Strangeness in My Mind PDF º in My ePUB ´ A his father s trade, selling boza a traditional mildly alcoholic Turkish drink on the street, and hoping to become rich, like other villagers who have settled the desolate hills outside the booming metropolis But luck never seems to be on Mevlut s side As he watches his relations settle down and make their fortunes, he spends three years writing love letters to a girl he saw just once at a wedding, only to elope by mistake with her sister And though he grows to cherish his wife and the family they have, he stumbles toward middle age in a series of jobs leading nowhere His sense of missing something leads him sometimes to the politics of his friends and intermittently to the teachings of a charismatic religious guide But every evening, without fail, Mevlut still wanders the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and wondering at the strangeness in his mind, the sensation that makes him feel different from everyone else, until fortune conspires once to let him understand at last what it is he has always yearned forTold from different perspectives by a host of beguiling characters, A Strangeness in My Mind is a modern epic of coming of age in a great city, a brilliant tableau of life among the newcomers who have changed the face of Istanbul over the past fifty years Here is a mesmerizing story of human longing, sure to take its place among Pamuk s finest achievements."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 624 pages
  • A Strangeness in My Mind
  • Orhan Pamuk
  • English
  • 19 March 2019
  • 0307700291

About the Author: Orhan Pamuk

Orhan Pamuk was born in Istanbul in My ePUB ´ in and grew up in a large family similar to those which he describes in his novels Cevdet Bey and His Sons and The Black Book, in the wealthy A Strangeness PDF or westernised district of Nisantasi As he writes in his autobiographical book Istanbul, from his childhood until the age of he devoted himself largely to painting and dreamed of becoming an artist After graduating from the secular Strangeness in My MOBI ï American Robert College in Istanbul, he studied architecture at Istanbul Technical University for three years, but abandoned the course when he gave up his ambition to become an architect and artist He went on to graduate in journalism from Istanbul University, but never worked as a journalist At the age of Pamuk decided to become a novelist, and giving up everything else retreated into his flat and began to writeHis first novel Cevdet Bey and His Sons was published seven years later in The novel is the story of three generations of a wealthy Istanbul family living in Nisantasi, Pamuk s own home district The novel was awarded both the Orhan Kemal and Milliyet literary prizes The following year Pamuk published his novel The Silent House, which in French translation won the Prix de la d couverte europ ene The White Castle about the frictions and friendship between a Venetian slave and an Ottoman scholar was published in English and many other languages from onwards, bringing Pamuk his first international fame The same year Pamuk went to America, where he was a visiting scholar at Columbia University in New York from to It was there that he wrote most of his novel The Black Book, in which the streets, past, chemistry and texture of Istanbul are described through the story of a lawyer seeking his missing wife This novel was published in Turkey in , and the French translation won the Prix France Culture The Black Book enlarged Pamuk s fame both in Turkey and internationally as an author at once popular and experimental, and able to write about past and present with the same intensity In Pamuk s daughter R ya was born That year saw the production of a film Hidden Face, whose script by Pamuk was based on a one page story in The Black BookHis novel The New Life, about young university students influenced by a mysterious book, was published in Turkey in and became one of the most widely read books in Turkish literature My Name Is Red, about Ottoman and Persian artists and their ways of seeing and portraying the non western world, told through a love story and family story, was published in This novel won the French Prix du meilleur livre tranger, the Italian Grinzane Cavour and the International IMPAC Dublin literary award From the mid s Pamuk took a critical stance towards the Turkish state in articles about human rights and freedom of thought, although he took little interest in politics Snow, which he describes as my first and last political novel was published in In this book set in the small city of Kars in northeastern Turkey he experimented with a new type of political novel , telling the story of violence and tension between political Islamists, soldiers, secularists, and Kurdish and Turkish nationalists Snow was selected as one of the best books of by The New York Times In a selection of his articles on literature and culture written for newspapers and magazines in Turkey and abroad, together with a selection of writings from his private notebooks, was published under the title Other Colours Pamuk s most recent book, Istanbul, is a poetical work that is hard to classify, combining the author s early memoirs up to the age of , and an essay about the city of Istanbul, illustrated with photographs from his own album, and pictures by western painters and Turkish photographers.