Caribbean Literature and the Public Sphere: From the



10 thoughts on “Caribbean Literature and the Public Sphere: From the Plantation to the Postcolonial

  1. Purple Iris Purple Iris says:

    This is an interesting book Lots of stimulating ideas, but I m not entirely comfortable with it For one thing, the first chapter makes it seem like a literary public sphere was or should have been necessary to slaves taking their freedom And I m still not convinced of the necessity or usefulness of a Caribbean wide periodization But I want to keep reading I d love to take my time with this, but I borrowed it, so depends on when the owner wants it back Well, I m into chapter two It s int This is an interesting book Lots of stimulating ideas, but I m not entirely comfortable with it For one thing, the first chapter makes it seem like a literary public sphere was or should have been necessary to slaves taking their freedom And I m still not convinced of the necessity or usefulness of a Caribbean wide periodization But I want to keep reading I d love to take my time with this, but I borrowed it, so depends on when the owner wants it back Well, I m into chapter two It s interesting to read literary criticism when I haven t read most of the books being discussed I feel like I can focuson the big ideas I m reminded that at some point I d like to really go back and look at poetry by Les Pionniers to see if it s as worthless as everyone insists it is I don t like the reference to the abolition of slavery in Haiti it was a Revolution And I m pretty sure a local public sphere developed well before the US occupation For instance, early 20th century writers like Justin Lh risson and Fernand Hibbertwere clearly adressing their compatriots I m at the end of chapter 5 Probably my favorite so far, maybe because I know the works being discussed quite well I am intrigued by the arguments made, although not quite ready to sign on to them yet The quotes from Dash are horrendous I ll have to come back and plug in the one from page 144 Yeah, so apparently, in The Other America Caribbean Literature In A New World Context, Dash states that in every intellectual there lurks the monster of all Haitian intellectuals, Fran ois Duvalier Wow Really What the flying fuck is all I can say to that The author cites several writers who left or were expulsed from their countries in the seventies and eighties, then states the position of the Caribbean writer in the transition from modern colonialism to postcoloniality had not been as precarious since the times of slavery literature had officially been exiled from the Caribbean public sphere p 151 Really, the whole of the Caribbean public sphere I enjoyed the section on Lamming Ready to be done with this now I ll try to come back soon and pull this review together


  2. Camille Camille says:

    Highly interesting It cannot be said Dalleo has not done his homework Brilliantly researched This work is not only good to learn of Dalleo s opinion on interrelationship between the public sphere and the literature produced, but it is even better as a gateway to a lot of other Caribbean theorists He also critiques a lot of Francophone and Hispanophone literature I had not read before and was not aware of.It s a great text for anyone doing a thesis on Caribbean literature as it will give you Highly interesting It cannot be said Dalleo has not done his homework Brilliantly researched This work is not only good to learn of Dalleo s opinion on interrelationship between the public sphere and the literature produced, but it is even better as a gateway to a lot of other Caribbean theorists He also critiques a lot of Francophone and Hispanophone literature I had not read before and was not aware of.It s a great text for anyone doing a thesis on Caribbean literature as it will give you a lot of sources to check out 4 out of 5 from me


  3. Jeremy Jeremy says:

    A model of comparative literature and a contribution to the understanding of Caribbean postcoloniality as opposed to postcolonialism, according to Dalleo s definitions.


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Caribbean Literature and the Public Sphere: From the Plantation to the Postcolonial ❮Reading❯ ➳ Caribbean Literature and the Public Sphere: From the Plantation to the Postcolonial ➬ Author Raphael Dalleo – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Bringing together the most exciting recent archival work in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean studies, Raphael Dalleo constructs a new literary history of the region that is both com Bringing together the most exciting recent archival work and the PDF È in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean studies, Raphael Dalleo constructs a new literary history of the region that Caribbean Literature PDF/EPUB or is both comprehensive and innovative He examines how changes in political, economic, and social structures have produced different sets of possibilities for writers to imagine their relationship Literature and the Kindle × to the institutions of the public sphere In the process, he provides a new context for rereading such major writers as Mary Seacole, Jos Mart , Jacques Roumain, Claude McKay, Marie Chauvet, and George Lamming, while also drawing lesser known figures into the story Dalleo s comparative approach will be important to Caribbeanists from all of the region s linguistic traditions, and his book contributes even broadly to debates in Latin American and postcolonial studies about postmodernity and globalization.