The Naughtiest Girl in the School ePUB ê The


  • Paperback
  • 244 pages
  • The Naughtiest Girl in the School
  • Enid Blyton
  • English
  • 10 February 2018
  • 0340917695

10 thoughts on “The Naughtiest Girl in the School

  1. Kavita Kavita says:

    Forget 1984 and Animal Farm if you thought that was scary, you should read The Naughtiest Girl in the School In this Stalinisque expos of life under a brutal regime, we see the conversion of little Elizabeth Allen from a normal little girl to one who learns how to knuckle down to the system and praise it.Elizabeth is a pretty eleven year old little girl who has spurts of fun and laughter, like any normal little girl She is given to a bit of naughtiness like pinning her governess stockings Forget 1984 and Animal Farm if you thought that was scary, you should read The Naughtiest Girl in the School In this Stalinisque expos of life under a brutal regime, we see the conversion of little Elizabeth Allen from a normal little girl to one who learns how to knuckle down to the system and praise it.Elizabeth is a pretty eleven year old little girl who has spurts of fun and laughter, like any normal little girl She is given to a bit of naughtiness like pinning her governess stockings together and laughing about it and the obvious conclusion her parents arrive is to send her away to boarding school about which she is not told until a week before she has to leave Nor is she given any information about the school and how it functions and her very natural fears of going to a strange place and meeting strange people is not put to rest, except to tell her that she will become a better person because no one would put up with her nonsense at Whyteleafe School Way to go with the great parenting bit So poor Elizabeth lands up at Whyteleafe, and before she even reaches, she is for some strange reason, ostracised by the students because she again very naturally, refuses to make friends at first sight with random strangers The real trouble starts once they reach the school, where we make the acquaintance of monitor Nora, who probably later hopped over and joined the Cheka or something Like a good upholder of the values of the regime, Nora has locked away Elizabeth s cherished belongings, threatened to do her bodily violence, and mocked at her distress, all of within one day of the starting of the school But Elizabeth s trials are not yet over.The weekly Meeting is yet to come her way In this school, the students govern themselves and have weekly meetings to dole out punishments and rewards in public, all presided over by William and Rita, the head boy and girl Brrrr In theory, this appears rather progressive, but in practice, it sreminiscent of North Korea than anything else The students often have lessons taken away from them whut and they are sometimes forced to do manual labour if they made mistakes They also have a system where all children have to put in their entire pocket money into a common fund and each person gets two shillings to spend per week You can ask for something extra but it is up to William and Rita to sanction it In short, you have to ask permission from the regime leaders to spend your own goddamned money and it can actually be refused Moreover, much of the money actually ends up being used on the beautification of the school or some such nonsense What exactly do they do with the fees, then When Elizabeth very properly decides not to hand over her parents hard earned money to these thugs, her money is stolen from her Literally grabbed and plonked into the common fund and over, she does not get her two shillings either You don t mess with North Korea Whyteleafe School Because if you do, you also get mocked in full assembly Your ancestry is torn apart and your parents are mocked in front of everyone else I am not exactly sure if they are carted off to the Gulag for your perceived crimes, but it appears to be a distinct possibility I actually found this book extremely terrifying when I read it for the first time Unlike with the Malory Towersor St Claire s series, I never dreamed of studying in Whyteleafe School The later books in the series are better mostly as Elizabeth becomes the enforcer rather than the enforcee but the first one makes me shudder as Elizabeth s spirit was slowly and gradually broken down by all the mocking, threats and punishments she receives for absolutely no reason at all The teachers seem powerless to help her, and mob power is given full reign in this system I dare R L Stine to come up with something so scary


  2. Theredheaded_Bibliomaniac Theredheaded_Bibliomaniac says:

    This was the first novel that made me a reader i am today Hence it holds a special place in my heart.Its a story of a spoiled Rich Kid being sent to Boarding school its so much fun to read this How she faces her fears and how she learns to be good yet naughty There are so many other characters in the book which are really good to her, from whom she learns to be like she is now.i really loved it then and definitely children will love it.


  3. Fay Roberts Fay Roberts says:

    I missed this in my childhood, but my daughter got a copy for Christmas My 5 year old daughter and 6 year old son both loved it and we all cried at one point lovely to share at this age.


  4. Paul E. Morph Paul E. Morph says:

    A rather delightful little tale of a quite extraordinary little girl and the somewhat bizarre school she is sent to


  5. Jana Tetzlaff Jana Tetzlaff says:

    The Naughtiest Girl in SchoolI bought a couple of Blyton s books a couple of years ago because I thought that I might have missed out not having had the chance to read them when I was a child I never got around to reading them until one Friday afternoon a couple of weeks ago The books all seem a bit formulaic and I had to constantly remind myself that they were written at a totally different time in a rather different society Nevertheless I couldn t shake the conflicting feelings about the bo The Naughtiest Girl in SchoolI bought a couple of Blyton s books a couple of years ago because I thought that I might have missed out not having had the chance to read them when I was a child I never got around to reading them until one Friday afternoon a couple of weeks ago The books all seem a bit formulaic and I had to constantly remind myself that they were written at a totally different time in a rather different society Nevertheless I couldn t shake the conflicting feelings about the book s premise that girls must behave in an obedient, proper and polite way at all times My inner feminist was screeching indignantly.I don t negate that it would be desirable if kids were taught to be polite, because there s quite a bit of rudeness going around these days I wonder, though, whether politeness and gentleness can really be taught or whether they are rather picked up by mimicking others I reject the notion of a uniform society, no matter how polite Being different, being individual should be celebrated in kids as well as in adults.The story of little Elizabeth s struggle to be naughty and horrid to achieve her goal of being sent home from Whyteleafe Boarding School drew me in despite myself, but it wasof a detached scientific reading, a fascination with a world that no longer exists in the depicted way if ever it did At first I thought that I wouldn t be able to get used to the archaic language, but it didn t bother me that much after a while.I am not really familiar with whole literary sub genre of boarding school setting, but I always had a soft spot for it, glorifying life at boarding school I did, obviously, never attend one myself I only owned one or two books set in the BS environment when I was a kid and I adored them.I seriously doubt the appeal of this book to young children today There are a few points in its favour the need for a best friends to share joy and worry with the desire to do well in school, to please parents and teachers the wish to be loved, to be surrounded by the people and objects one loves the ability to easily adapt to new surroundingsThere are, however, as many points I d argues make the book inaccessible for today s youth Just to mention two the old fashioned and dated language the almost tech free setting sports, music, painting, and dancing as opposed to video games, internet, mobile phones, etc Then again, the Harry Potter books worked fine without technical gadgetry, but they had spells and potions to counter that lack not to mention, a lotsuspense with the fight of good vs evil and faraction.The whole book is extremely feeling based The most important thing is to pass the judgement and gain the appraisal of others.If one were inclined to do so, one could break the entire novel into lessons the pleasure of sharing as opposed to hoarding everything to oneself the good deed of saying I m sorry pride is wrong and will only hurt oneself strength lies within one s ability to change one s mindAnd so on and so forth The almost socialist self governance of the pupils amused me Of course, this would only work if the world or a school were populated by as perfect role models as portrayed here, who d never abuse the power given to them, and we all know that the world doesn t work that way not even in a boarding school micro cosmos


  6. Sathya Sekar Sathya Sekar says:

    Of all Ms Blyton s school series, the Whytleafe School series featuring Elizabeth Allen have remain personal favorites since I read them about three decades ago Even when I was young, the notion of student based bodies students bringing problems and students solving it themselves in a common forum made a deep impression on me There are also socialistic tendencies around everyone getting an equal share of money which also seemed to be so right to me So to me, the Naughtiest Girl series was Of all Ms Blyton s school series, the Whytleafe School series featuring Elizabeth Allen have remain personal favorites since I read them about three decades ago Even when I was young, the notion of student based bodies students bringing problems and students solving it themselves in a common forum made a deep impression on me There are also socialistic tendencies around everyone getting an equal share of money which also seemed to be so right to me So to me, the Naughtiest Girl series was quite radical in concept.Then the characters themselves were so lovable Elizabeth is feisty and utterly charming You cannot but help like her from the word go She is easily my favorite Blyton character The head and girl Rita and William, the Beauty and the Beast head mistresses seem to the wise people we can aspire to.Blyton s portrayal of Elizabeth as a grey character, how she swings from the black to the white makes her a triumphant creation and perhaps a unique heroine in the annals of boarding school heroines


  7. Lisa Lisa says:

    Elizabeth Allen is a horrid, spoiled brat Her parents send her to Whyteleafe, a school with Socialist and sadistic tendencies that strips her of her foolish pride and transforms her into a sensible, loving, moral, typically British schoolgirl I read my mother s childhood copy of this book printed on flimsy, WWII era paper when I first visited England I spent the rest of my childhood rereading it and writing parodies of it.


  8. Tanvi Tanvi says:

    4.25 out of 5 starsReread it in 2020 after almost 17 years and it was wonderful Major nostalgic feelings


  9. Fiona Baker Fiona Baker says:

    The very first proper book I ever read I think I was maybe 7 or 8 years old It has lead to 35 yrs of reading with a passion, 1000s of books many I ll never remember reading but this one I ll never forget I can even remember the point in time when I finished it, where I was at home and how proud I was of myself Most importantly how proud my dad was of me He too had a passion for reading and loved books Apologies to those reading this expecting a review and not my trip down memory lane The very first proper book I ever read I think I was maybe 7 or 8 years old It has lead to 35 yrs of reading with a passion, 1000s of books many I ll never remember reading but this one I ll never forget I can even remember the point in time when I finished it, where I was at home and how proud I was of myself Most importantly how proud my dad was of me He too had a passion for reading and loved books Apologies to those reading this expecting a review and not my trip down memory lane Nevertheless, if choosing this for your child my childhood self says Awesome


  10. Kailey (BooksforMKs) Kailey (BooksforMKs) says:

    An adorable book about a spoiled little girl, Elizabeth, who is sent to boarding school, and learns self control She makes friends, learns that giving is better than receiving, and discovers that she is much happier when she controls her temper and is compassionate toward others.I love the simple, old fashioned writing style, and the sweet characters The plot is delightful and funny I thought the main character, Elizabeth, was hilarious and engaging She is talented and strong willed, and her An adorable book about a spoiled little girl, Elizabeth, who is sent to boarding school, and learns self control She makes friends, learns that giving is better than receiving, and discovers that she is much happier when she controls her temper and is compassionate toward others.I love the simple, old fashioned writing style, and the sweet characters The plot is delightful and funny I thought the main character, Elizabeth, was hilarious and engaging She is talented and strong willed, and her teachers and classmates love that about her But she can t control her wild impulses, and they gently teach her to manage those wayward emotions I loved her character development I was very intrigued by the system in the school where the student government manages the everyday affairs of the school The children put all their allowance money from their parents into a school fund, so that every child can get the same amount of allowance, whether they are rich or poor When a student misbehaves, a student council made up of the headgirl and headboy and 12 elected monitors devise a proper consequence for the misdemeanor with the approval of the teachers.It s all done with such wisdom and loving care I would love to be a teacher at this school If only student governments today had such systems, maybe young people would learn better self control


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The Naughtiest Girl in the School❰EPUB❯ ✹ The Naughtiest Girl in the School Author Enid Blyton – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Elizabeth Allen is spoilt and selfish When she is sent away to boarding school she makes up her mind to be the naughtiest pupil there has ever been But Elizabeth soon discovers that being bad isn t as Elizabeth Allen is spoilt and selfish When she Girl in eBook ✓ is sent away to boarding school she makes up her mind to be the naughtiest pupil there has ever been But Elizabeth soon discovers that being bad isn t as simple as it seems.


About the Author: Enid Blyton

See also Greek Enida Blaitona Latvian Russian Inid Girl in eBook ✓ Blajton Serbian Enid Mary Blyton was an English author of children s booksBorn in South London, Blyton was the eldest of three children, and showed an early interest in music and reading She was educated at St Christopher s School, Beckenham, and having decided not to pursue her music at Ipswich High School, where she The Naughtiest PDF/EPUB ² trained as a kindergarten teacher She taught for five years before her marriage to editor Hugh Pollock, with whom she had two daughters This marriage ended in divorce, and Blyton remarried in , to surgeon Kenneth Fraser Darrell Waters She died in , one year after her second husbandBlyton was a prolific author of children s books, who penned an estimated books over about Naughtiest Girl in MOBI ô years Her stories were often either children s adventure and mystery stories, or fantasies involving magic Notable series include The Famous Five, The Secret Seven, The Five Find Outers, Noddy, The Wishing Chair, Mallory Towers, and St Clare sAccording to the Index Translationum, Blyton was the fifth most popular author in the world in , coming after Lenin but ahead of Shakespeare See also her pen name Mary Pollock.