Mirador: Irène Némirovsky, mia madre PDF ↠



10 thoughts on “Mirador: Irène Némirovsky, mia madre

  1. Jeanette (Again) Jeanette (Again) says:

    Elisabeth Gille was only five years old when her mother, Irene Nemirovsky, was taken away to Auschwitz She never saw her mother again, and had almost no concrete memories of her She wrote The Mirador in the first person, as if she were Irene telling her own life story The result is a work that often readslike a combination of autobiography and history book than a conventional novel The book is divided into two parts, with Part I being the stronger of the two in terms of readability Pa Elisabeth Gille was only five years old when her mother, Irene Nemirovsky, was taken away to Auschwitz She never saw her mother again, and had almost no concrete memories of her She wrote The Mirador in the first person, as if she were Irene telling her own life story The result is a work that often readslike a combination of autobiography and history book than a conventional novel The book is divided into two parts, with Part I being the stronger of the two in terms of readability Part I covers Irene s early life in Russia, the family s flight to France in the wake of the Revolution, and several years in France living among other Russian emigres I ve always been fascinated by the history of Russia in the early 1900s, so it was especially interesting for me to learn of the lifestyle and political leanings of her wealthy Russian Jewish family I could see the parallels in the Nemirovsky family s plight with that of the family in Irene s short work of fiction, Snow in Autumn Part II jumps forward in time to World War II, when Irene is a married mother of two daughters, living in rural France The contrast between her previous life of privilege and her wartime reduced circumstances really stands out She seems to have clung to the attitudes of the privileged, not believing she would ever be a victim of the Holocaust because of who she was She had been encouraged by her father and others to go to America long before it was too late, but she was almost scornful of those admonishments I felt there was a stylistic change between Parts I and II, making Part II a little weaker in narrative flow, although certainly not any less interesting in the particulars of Irene s life story.The most compelling writing in the book is in the snippets of memory tacked on to the end of each chapter, where we see Elisabeth first as a young girl and then a young woman, living a life overshadowed by the early loss of her mother and the subsequent trauma of the war 4.5 stars


  2. Kasa Cotugno Kasa Cotugno says:

    How well do any of us know our mothers save what we have been told and discovered through proximity Elisabeth Gille was only five years old when her mother, the wonderful novelist Irene Nemerovsky, died in Auschewitz Through her mother s evocative writings and scant memories, Gille wrote this homage to her mother in 1992, creating an autobiography for her It reads as smoothly as Suite Francais, thanks in part to this lovely new translation, which is long overdue and only can have the effect How well do any of us know our mothers save what we have been told and discovered through proximity Elisabeth Gille was only five years old when her mother, the wonderful novelist Irene Nemerovsky, died in Auschewitz Through her mother s evocative writings and scant memories, Gille wrote this homage to her mother in 1992, creating an autobiography for her It reads as smoothly as Suite Francais, thanks in part to this lovely new translation, which is long overdue and only can have the effect of enhancing Nemerovsky s reputation in the English speaking world As with the newly translated works of Hans Fallada, this is a view of Europe from within the horrors of the mid 20th century, told only as one who lived it can It wrenches the heart, particularly when observations are made from the point of view of the child as a child and when she is long past the point of being a child


  3. Lynne Perednia Lynne Perednia says:

    Elisabeth Gille was five years old when her mother was taken to the death camps and didn t return Her father suffered the same fate She and her older sister survived when a German officer saw the older girl s blonde hair and told their governess they were not taking any children that night The governess understood She and the children disappeared.Decades later, when she was older than her mother ever became, and although she remembered nothing about her, Elisabeth tried to see the world thro Elisabeth Gille was five years old when her mother was taken to the death camps and didn t return Her father suffered the same fate She and her older sister survived when a German officer saw the older girl s blonde hair and told their governess they were not taking any children that night The governess understood She and the children disappeared.Decades later, when she was older than her mother ever became, and although she remembered nothing about her, Elisabeth tried to see the world through her mother s eyes That attempt is The Mirador Her mother was the once acclaimed, then forgotten, then reclaimed, writer Irene Nemirovsky In pre WWII France, Nemirovsky was greatly admired for her novels such as David Golder, the story of a Jewish banker who loses, then regains, a fortune Reactions to this novel and Nemirovsky s being published in right wing journals before her death made her a controversial figure as well as a celebrated writer.In The Mirador, Gille writes from her mother s point of view about being raised in a secular home of a rich banker where the tenents of their family s heritage were never celebrated She imagines her mother coming of age during the Russian Revolution, moving back and forth from the gilded cities of Russia as that world crumbled and Paris Irene is portrayed as preternatural, a wise beyond her years woman child who nontheless has no clue about how dire her family s situation is Instead, she is wrapped up in resentment of her mother, who spends her evenings with varied men friends while her father travels the world on business, and her books It is a lovely world, and the fact we know it will soon disappear adds to its poignant elegance.After the revolution and her family s safe return to France, there is a gap in the story Now it s 1942 and Irene has married and given birth to two daughters Their neighbors in the village where they moved are starting to shun them A daughter needs emergency surgery one neighbor finally succumbs to human kindness to take the child to another village to find one doctor who finally agrees to perform the surgery, then immediately sends the girl back The family will lose their Parisian apartment relatives make one last trip to retrieve some valuables they can sell to live on.First her husband s employer refuses to help them, then Irene discovers that her belief that they are safe because she is a famous French writer is false The literary establishment that once embraced her as a talented young woman who came to them from Russia is as unable to stand up to the Nazis as the rest of mainstream French society.At the end of each chapter is a short look at Irene from the viewpoint of her daughter years later, adding to the feeling of impending doom.If viewed only as a work of fiction, The Mirador has a flimsy quality to it its strengths arein the way of capturing certain scenes such as wintry sleigh rides and helpless aristocrats trapped in a hotel rather than a tightly woven narrative As a way to try to come to terms with a complicated woman s life and complicated outlook, however, The Mirador is an emotionally open work that makes the reader feel compassion toward its author and her aims It also sparks new interest in examining all of Nemirovsky s works in a new light, especially her most famous, incomplete work, Suite Francaise


  4. Michael Michael says:

    This is a remarkable book I ve never read anything quite like it Elisabeth Gille was naturally enough troubled by the utter blindness of her mother Irene Nemirovsky, a very successful novelist, to the dangers posed to her and her family by the Nazis while there was still time to flee from France Elisabeth and her sister only barely escaped joining their parents in Auschwitz.Many decades after the war Elisabeth Gill set out to write this fictional autobiography of her mother The scenes set i This is a remarkable book I ve never read anything quite like it Elisabeth Gille was naturally enough troubled by the utter blindness of her mother Irene Nemirovsky, a very successful novelist, to the dangers posed to her and her family by the Nazis while there was still time to flee from France Elisabeth and her sister only barely escaped joining their parents in Auschwitz.Many decades after the war Elisabeth Gill set out to write this fictional autobiography of her mother The scenes set in the prosperous world of Tsarist Russia are very, very vivid and then she moves on to the period of her mother Irene s exile in a small French village In this fiction, Irene comes to realize her terrible mistake but in reality in seems possible that she never did up until the moment she was sent to her death Irene was simply so totally in love with French culture that she could not see that her Russian Jewish roots were what would define her to the French and German anti Semites, and that love nearly led to her children s death along with her own and that of her equally naive husband A wondrous book that should be read by anyone who appreciates Nemirovksy s fiction


  5. Kirsty Kirsty says:

    Elisabeth Gille s imagined memoir of her mother, Russian Ukrainian novelist Irene Nemirovsky, has been translated from its original French by Marina Harss Of Gille s curious mixture of fact and fiction, The Nation comments that she is not interested in defending her mother s reputation Instead, she sets out to live in her mother s head Gille was only five years old when her mother was arrested by the Gestapo for being Jewish Nemirovsky had spent over half of her life in France after movi Elisabeth Gille s imagined memoir of her mother, Russian Ukrainian novelist Irene Nemirovsky, has been translated from its original French by Marina Harss Of Gille s curious mixture of fact and fiction, The Nation comments that she is not interested in defending her mother s reputation Instead, she sets out to live in her mother s head Gille was only five years old when her mother was arrested by the Gestapo for being Jewish Nemirovsky had spent over half of her life in France after moving around Europe a lot with her parents, trying to escape the fallout from the Russian revolution Gille, understandably, grew up remembering next to nothing about her mother, who was a figure, a name, Irene Nemirovsky, a once popular novelist, a Russian emigre from an immensely rich family, a Jew who didn t consider herself one and who even contributed to collaborationist periodicals, and a woman who died in Auschwitz because she was a Jew To her daughter she was a tragic enigma and a stranger Both of Gille s parents were killed in Auschwitz she and her sister Denise only survived because they were taken into hiding.In her acknowledgment at the start of the book, Gille writes that her work was imagined on the basis of other books namely those which her mother wrote She goes on to say that all of the letters and citations which have been included throughout The Mirador Dreamed Memories of Irene Nemirovsky by Her Daughter are authentic, and have been taken from unpublished notes Gille has attempted, throughout, to capture her mother s own writing style, and consequently the entire book is written from the imagined perspective of Nemirovsky The volume, published in English by NYRB, also includes an interview with Gille, and an afterword written by Rene de Ceccatty The Mirador has been split into two sections November 1929 and June 1942 The first part takes place in Kiev and St Petersburg Here, during Nemirovsky s childhood, there were pogroms and riots, parties and excursions, then revolution At this point, Gille writes For me, if Finland is winter and St Petersburg, with its yellow mists shrouding the shores of the Neva is autumn, then Kiev is summer We were not yet rich when we lived there, just well to do The family eventually settled in Paris, the place where Nemirovsky felt most content In these imaginings, particularly of Nemirovsky s early life, her own mother appears to be a floating figure, flitting around to give orders, and giving much of her attention to clothes and the season , rather than to Irene.The imagined memories of Nemirovsky are interspersed with brief snapshots of the author s life when she was small In May 1920, for example, she pulls at her mother s sleeve her mother is standing in the middle of the courtyard, reading The young woman shifts the book, pushes back her glasses, and smiles Her tender, myopic gaze caresses the child distractedly The child wrinkles her brow, releases the sleeve, and moves away Gille s echoing of her mother s prose style has been lovingly handled, and feels relatively authentic throughout I had to keep reminding myself that I was essentially reading a work of fiction Like her mother s, Gille s writing is poetic and layered, filled with gorgeous and striking imagery Every sentence is in some way evocative, and her sentences are beautifully crafted A real sense of place and time have been deftly assembled When on a cruise down the River Dnieper, undertaken when Nemirovsky was quite young, for instance, Gille composes the following In the immensity of the Russian sky, the moon looked green, touched by the dying rays of the setting sun and crisscrossed by spectral clouds that slid over its white surface, leaving behind a trail of dark shadows The silver domes of the church of Saint Andrew, which we had just passed, still glimmered faintly among the trees The immense branches of the forest, which descended to the very edge of the river, draped the shoreline in darkness, but the middle of the current was dappled with metallic coloured spots as far as the eye could see The historical and social contexts have been well set out too, and unfolds alongside Nemirovsky s own life The Mirador was not quite what I was expecting, and it is certainly unlike the majority of memoirs and biographies which I have read to date It was unusual, and I enjoyed the way in which Gille has approached her work There are some problems with the narrative, however It tends to jump around in place and time with no warning, and can be a little jarring in consequence The Mirador does, however, really come together It is both mesmerising and memorable, and I very much admire what Gille set out to do here The Mirador is vivid and sometimes quite surprising, and highlights a highly tumultuous period of history, and its effects upon one rather remarkable woman


  6. Wendy Wendy says:

    Elisabeth Gille was five years old when her mother, Irene Nemirovsky, was deported to Auschwitz She and her sister managed to survive, and she became an editor and translator She wrote The Mirador, her first book, at the age of 50, then went on to write other successful books in the few remaining years of her life This account is written mostly in the voice of Nemirovsky as Gille imagines it, looking back from two points November 1929 and June 1942 interspersed with brief vignettes descri Elisabeth Gille was five years old when her mother, Irene Nemirovsky, was deported to Auschwitz She and her sister managed to survive, and she became an editor and translator She wrote The Mirador, her first book, at the age of 50, then went on to write other successful books in the few remaining years of her life This account is written mostly in the voice of Nemirovsky as Gille imagines it, looking back from two points November 1929 and June 1942 interspersed with brief vignettes describing her own life The book adds much to a reading of Nemirovsky s work while also adding to an understanding of the times and places where she lived from pre revolutionary Kiev to post WWI Paris It also helps make sense of why it was that she refused to face the terrible reality that was closing in on her that as Jew, even a secular and assimilated Jew, she was doomed, and her family with her Reading the last pages, I thought of Chris Hedge s essay published July 9 by Common Dreams in which he writes of the sort of collective capacity for self delusion he witnessed in Bosnia and Kosovo In conclusion, he quotes another Russian, Doestoevsky, who had Dimitri ask Starov in The Brothers Karamazov, What must I do to win salvation The answer Above all else, never lie to yourself As she evokes the memory of her mother and imagines what her mother might have been thinking as she neared her end, Gille explores the same territory


  7. Jenny Jenny says:

    Interesting, certainly, and well written Yet in a way it felt like being in an old historical building that had been restored to its original condition it might look exactly the same as it used to, but the walls aren t the same walls, the floors aren t the same floors, and the furniture isn t the same furniture It might be a faithful reproduction, but it isn t authentic In passages where, in another writer s work, we might be overly conscious of the will of the creator, here we are consc Interesting, certainly, and well written Yet in a way it felt like being in an old historical building that had been restored to its original condition it might look exactly the same as it used to, but the walls aren t the same walls, the floors aren t the same floors, and the furniture isn t the same furniture It might be a faithful reproduction, but it isn t authentic In passages where, in another writer s work, we might be overly conscious of the will of the creator, here we are conscious only of the exigencies of the characters Nothingclearly reveals the gift of the storyteller Jean Pierre Maxence, on Nemirovsky s writing 193 194 To leave this world But what awaits me What could it be, this life beyond I would like to go awayBut would it be an ending This nuisance of a soul, could it be immortal Tristan Bernard 204


  8. Diane Diane says:

    I have been a huge fan of Ir ne N mirovsky since I learned of her existence, and her fate, in 2004, with the appearance of a long hidden manuscript of her final novel, Suite Fran aise N mirovsky was a fabulous story teller, and I recommend all of her work However, this fascinating book was written by her younger daughter It tells the story of N mirovsky s life from birth to her deportation from France and murder at Auschwitz in 1942 but in first person, from the perspective of N mirovsky he I have been a huge fan of Ir ne N mirovsky since I learned of her existence, and her fate, in 2004, with the appearance of a long hidden manuscript of her final novel, Suite Fran aise N mirovsky was a fabulous story teller, and I recommend all of her work However, this fascinating book was written by her younger daughter It tells the story of N mirovsky s life from birth to her deportation from France and murder at Auschwitz in 1942 but in first person, from the perspective of N mirovsky herself Though nearly all of it is told in exposition, making it very dense, even tiring, reading at times, rich, detailed descriptions make vivid the turbulent times and circumstances that formed this great writer, and brought about her tragic, criminal demise


  9. Carol Bundy Carol Bundy says:

    I found this memoir novel an amazing act of devotion As an attempt to know an unknown mother, it is heroic As a piece of fiction it is wonderful.I would like to read Nemirovsky s novel, David Golder, which is perhaps the most troubling evidence Elisabeth Gille had to work with regarding her mother.


  10. Helen Helen says:

    Dreamed memories at the very end of the book, there is this passage from Alfred de Musset written after he attended a performance of a Moliere play I was lost in my thoughts somebody seen at the performance made me remember some singing, almost unknown verses from an unfinished poem by Andre Chenier, lines pure as chance and not so much written as dreamed I wasn t afraid to speak them out loud, even in the presence of Moliere, whose great shade certainly wouldn t take offense Dreamed memories at the very end of the book, there is this passage from Alfred de Musset written after he attended a performance of a Moliere play I was lost in my thoughts somebody seen at the performance made me remember some singing, almost unknown verses from an unfinished poem by Andre Chenier, lines pure as chance and not so much written as dreamed I wasn t afraid to speak them out loud, even in the presence of Moliere, whose great shade certainly wouldn t take offense This book is not a memoir how much can a five year old active child actually remember, and much less understand, all the danger and her parents not bending under it and it s best that she does not actually remember It salong the lines, your mom s and your voice are so much alike, I couldn t tell the difference but even their voices are not the same Elisabeth Gille is a great writer in her own right, and I am looking forward to reading her Shadows of a Childhood What a shame she was not granted a longer life and we only have these two books to know her by But what a wonderful, insightful, warm book she wrote about Irene Nemirovsky


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Mirador: Irène Némirovsky, mia madre [PDF / Epub] ✅ Mirador: Irène Némirovsky, mia madre By Élisabeth Gille – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Mirador non una semplice biografia di Ir ne N mirovsky la scrittrice stessa che, attraverso la voce della figlia, lisabeth Gille, ci racconta in prima persona di s e della propria vita E rievoca con a Mirador non Némirovsky, mia Kindle Ô una semplice biografia di Ir ne N mirovsky la scrittrice stessa che, attraverso la voce della figlia, lisabeth Gille, ci racconta in prima persona di s e della propria vita E rievoca con accenti intimi e originali la Russia lacerata e suggestiva dell infanzia e dell adolescenza Poi, dopo l esilio seguito alla Rivoluzione d Ottobre, sono la Francia e Parigi Mirador: Irène PDF or lo scenario in cui Irene spicca il volo e diventa famosa Infine la provincia francese il teatro che vede svolgersi l ultimo atto della sua esistenza, che anche l ultimo atto di una borghesia colta ma incapace di cogliere i segni premonitori della tragedia che si sta abbattendo sull Europa e che troppo tardi si accorge della furia che travolger milioni di persone, come Irène Némirovsky, mia MOBI · la stessa Ir ne, deportata nelad Auschwitz, dove mor di tifo un mese dopo Mirador uno sguardo intimo e privilegiato sui suoi legami con il padre e la madre, il marito e le figlie, la fatica della continua fuga fino alla drammatica fine Numerosi sono i nodi affrontati la fama e le sue illusioni, il giudaismo e la Shoah , ma il tema fondamentale della vita familiare e della maternit a dominare la narrazione Il rapporto tormentato, seppur breve, tra lisabeth e la madre Ir ne il filo rosso che lega ogni vicenda di questo racconto.