A Season With Verona: Travels Around Italy In Search Of

A Season With Verona: Travels Around Italy In Search Of Illusion, National Character And Goals! ☂ A Season With Verona: Travels Around Italy In Search Of Illusion, National Character And Goals! PDF / Epub ✐ Author Tim Parks – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Good A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition All pages are intact, and the cover is intact including dust cover, if applicable The spine may show signs of wear Pages can include limi Good A copy that has With Verona: ePUB ´ been read, but remains in clean condition All pages are intact, and the cover is intact including dust cover, if applicable The spine may show signs of wear Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include From the library of labelsSome of our books may have slightly worn corners, and minor creases to the covers Please note the cover may sometimes be different to the one shown.


10 thoughts on “A Season With Verona: Travels Around Italy In Search Of Illusion, National Character And Goals!

  1. Efka Efka says:

    Traveling for a full year around Italy in a bus, full of calcio ultras, rooting for a small, provincial team in order to write a book about it does not sound like a terrific idea But that what Tim Parks did And the result is quite impressive It would have been evenimpressive had I read this book no later than a couple of years after it was published, as it seemed a bit outdated at moments now, almost a full 20 years later Still, being outdated also meant that it had been a very nice th Traveling for a full year around Italy in a bus, full of calcio ultras, rooting for a small, provincial team in order to write a book about it does not sound like a terrific idea But that what Tim Parks did And the result is quite impressive It would have been evenimpressive had I read this book no later than a couple of years after it was published, as it seemed a bit outdated at moments now, almost a full 20 years later Still, being outdated also meant that it had been a very nice throwback, remembering names and places that have been a bit forgotten The first thing you have to know, is that it is not a football book Not ENTIRELLY a football book, to make myselfclear As the title suggests, it is also in search of illusion and national character And it s not bad if you re into Italy as a country and a culture as well as calcio. But if you want a pure football book, I d recommend you a book by John Foot, called Calcio a history of Italian football , as it is an ultimate recollection of everything that makes Italian football unique it is purely about football, players, coaches, tactics, referees you name it Tim Parks book is muchabout a nation, about people and about a culture that gives birth to ultras and national mentality as a whole He spends some 30, maybe even 40 pages writing about Marsiglia case a case that has almost absolutely nothing to do with football Why did the author do it Probably to illustrate Veronese mentality, as well as all Italian character as well Being a fan of Hellas Verona, a provincial team that spent most of it s recent 50 years history swinging between Serie A and Serie B, Tim Parks has a lot of passion for a team he supports and he shows it in this book Also, probably due to the same aforementioned passion, you may be certain there won t be much objectivity, especially regarding the big teams YouTube enables us to check almost every moment, every match, every episode he wrote about And usually not to his favor Nuno Gomes had been blatantly offside , he writes Oncethe referee robbed us in favour of the big guns he exclaims And so you check that match on YouTube, aaaaand. It s not an offside And, of course, Juventus The author here is definitely not too proud to be fashionably anti Juve He even managed to badmouth Del Piero, also calling him finished in the process Yes, the Same Del Piero, who never said or did anything wrong in his whole career, who had been an Italian sweetheart and who had received a standing ovation in the notorious Santiago Bernabeu Would it have been too hard to support his team without blaming everyone and everything, especially those mysterious them Sure, but I guess that would not have been an Italian way So, all in all, probably Mr Parks had eventually found Goals, Illusion and national character of this wonderful country.Read it, it even might serve as a very peculiar guidebook And it can teach you poems, too Vicentino maledetto, hai mangiatto il mio micettoLOL.A strong 4


  2. Andrew Andrew says:

    One of the best books about football s deeper appeal Verona,a city often forgotten about in the classical litany of great Italian cities,has some of the most intense footballing rivalries with minnows like Chievo Verona, the Flying Donkeys ,but also with the near neighbours,Brescia,Padova Vicenza s promotion from B to A was overturned Ti One of the best books about football s deeper appeal Verona,a city often forgotten about in the classical litany of great Italian cities,has some of the most intense footballing rivalries with minnows like Chievo Verona, the Flying Donkeys ,but also with the near neighbours,Brescia,Padova my Italian team,Vicenza I followed the biancorossi for the 1985 86 season which ended in the calcionero fall out a punishment for corruption Vicenza s promotion from B to A was overturned Tim Parks really gets under the radar, analyses enthuses over the commitment devotion of Hellas Verona s combative fans.As an Englishman italianised ,he is a very devil in literary terms not holding back in his judgements on Italy s troubled post war political history, the often unpleasant aspects of Italian football alleigances.There is something here for all italianophiles,as Parks understands the dynamics of modern Italy as no foreigner has a right to.I found myself nodding at his observations assertions but this saga reads well too, will have you wondering why no one has ever tried it before.It hasreality than Nick Hornby s Arsenal panegyric, is a welcome addition to the genre of football non fiction most footballers employ ghost writers,whose deathless prose condemns many of our sporting heroes to open ridicule in countless autobiographies.I like Tim Parks s novels but his non fiction work stands tall too


  3. Richard Richard says:

    Perhaps the best soccer memoir ever written Vastly superior to the earlier Castel de Sangro book Excellent tale of Italian football through Verona s struggle with possible relegation Good look at Italy in the eyes of fans, and what makes the rivalries Cheating, Divining, possible match fixing, its all there and fun.I reread this following my trip to Italy and it is even better when read as a travelogue.


  4. Adam Edwards Adam Edwards says:

    Absolutely brilliant from start to finish this is as gripping as any fictional thriller, hilarious in parts and an absolute must if you re a football fan as opposed to just a team name fan Don t look up any results from the season in the book, part of the fantastically unbearable tension is not knowing what s going to happen next Superb.


  5. Donald Donald says:

    Only a handful of books have ever brought me to tears from laughter, yet Park s account of da bomb had me rolling Overall a very well written account, featuring future stars like Mutu and Laursen And what a deal, Honey, I have to attend every road game for the whole season It s for work, really.


  6. Brian Brian says:

    If you are not in love with Italy already, you will be after reading this British expat s experience of living in Verona with his Italian wife and children This book, in particular, touches on the universal experience of world soccer fanaticism.


  7. David David says:

    My favourite sports book and believe me I ve read a few It has the real authenticity of a fan going to every game It helps that he chose a nail biting season for Hellas Verona too.


  8. Adrian Fingleton Adrian Fingleton says:

    One of the best sports books I have ever read Plus an insight into the Italian psyche What s not to like


  9. Tim Tim says:

    The opening chapter is possibly the best, most erudite text you ll read on any sport ever It s worth the admission price alone The chapter, almost the whole book, is like an anthropologist s journey into the world of an unknown tribe the brigate, the Hellas Verona ultras Butthan that it s a gripping tale of one provincial team s season in Serie A The final outcome is desperately important only to this small group of people, but in travelling with them we learn why this team, this seas The opening chapter is possibly the best, most erudite text you ll read on any sport ever It s worth the admission price alone The chapter, almost the whole book, is like an anthropologist s journey into the world of an unknown tribe the brigate, the Hellas Verona ultras Butthan that it s a gripping tale of one provincial team s season in Serie A The final outcome is desperately important only to this small group of people, but in travelling with them we learn why this team, this season, this game is so muchimportant than anything else in the world, to them, right here, right now It s the human connection to history, to the community, to each other The whole footballing myth is blown apart during the course of the novel the players are exposed as mercenaries, bought and sold for a profit by an owner who seemingly cares nothing for the team But in spite all of this, and knowing this, the fans care, we care, and ultimately that is the beautiful insanity that is football


  10. Paul Haspel Paul Haspel says:

    A season in European football alright, soccer lasts about eight and a half months, going from fall through winter into spring and early summer but that time can seemlike an eternity to the sport s countless fans across the continent The fervid fan culture surrounding European football can be an astonishing thing to the usuallysedate followers of North America s major professional sports and author Tim Parks, an Englishman and avid football fan who lives and works in Italy, A season in European football alright, soccer lasts about eight and a half months, going from fall through winter into spring and early summer but that time can seemlike an eternity to the sport s countless fans across the continent The fervid fan culture surrounding European football can be an astonishing thing to the usuallysedate followers of North America s major professional sports and author Tim Parks, an Englishman and avid football fan who lives and works in Italy, provides a valuable look inside soccer fan culture in his book A Season with Verona.Parks teaches at university in Milan, but lives in Verona, and follows the Hellas Verona football club and the travails of being a Hellas Verona fan, as Parks describes them, might sound familiar to Americans who follow one of the smaller market Major League Baseball teams Can a small market team win the championship of Serie A, the highest classification for Italian soccer Yes, theoretically Hellas Verona won the championship back in 1984 85, just as small market baseball teams like the Kansas City Royals or Minnesota Twins have won a World Series title from time to time Yet from year to year, the same major market clubs across Italy Roma and Lazio in the capital region, the two Milan clubs A.C Milan and Inter Milan , Juventus from Turin always seem to win and the fans of small market teams like Hellas almost seem to savour the unfairness of it all.Parks, while not Veronese himself, is fully invested in the on the pitch fortunes of Hellas Verona, as is his Italian born son Accordingly, for this book he commits himself to attending every single one of Hellas Verona s 34 matches during the 2000 01 season, both home and away, and to record his impressions of the entire season This commitment will involve road trips up and down the entire peninsula of Italy sometimes in a filthy bus full of noisy fans sometimes in a chartered plane with the players, as an official guest of the team It is from this ethnographic, experience based approach thatA Season with Verona gets its subtitle Travels Around Italy in Search of Illusion, National Character, and GoalsCertain themes emerge as Parks follows the team through a series of often frustrating matches One is the divide between northern and southern Italy Fans from Verona, the northern city that is the locale for Romeo and Juliet, like to characterize the fans of teams from southern Italy as somehow slower, not as cultured or civilised indeed, there is a different stereotype to be directed against the fans of each rival team Yet Hellas Verona fans, as Parks describes them, have a reputation for racist behaviour in contrast with other Italian teams, the club had never, as of the season that Parks chronicles, fielded a black player At several points throughout the book, Parks looks on in dismay as some of the team s most hard core fans direct racist chants against black players for opposing teams.Yet as Parks tells it in a manner that a great many sports fans from many countries will no doubt find eminently relatable much of one s ability to think critically goes out the window when victory or defeat for one s favourite team is at stake Parks, remembering his impressions of a frustrating game between Hellas Verona and Inter Milan, differentiates in a splendidly literary manner between the fan experience of competitive professional sports and that of other cultural ritualsI have often thought about the relation between competitive sports and aesthetics You can become intensely engaged in the outcome of a play or opera I still remember my adolescent horror when I realized that Cordelia was truly dead Yet it is not like worrying about the result of a game.Yes, I could actually leave this stadium, it occurs to me, feelingappalled about Verona being beaten than by watching the representation of a young woman cut down in the prime of life Or indeed any other narrative awfulness Forget Silence of the Lambs , watch Hellas losepp 112 13 As the season goes on, with one frustrating Hellas loss after another, Parks and his fellow fans cease thinking championship, and begin worrying about the prospects for relegation European fans already know this concept well others might benefit from a refresher Every season, a couple of the worst teams from major league Serie A get relegated or sent down to minor league Serie B, while a couple of the best Serie B teams get promoted to Serie A If such a system existed in American baseball, then the Balti Orioles, the majors worst team last year, might have gotten sent down to the Triple A International League while the Memphis Redbirds, who won the 2018 Minor League World Series, might get to join the American League and play teams like the Yankees and the White Sox Once relegation becomes a serious prospect for Hellas Verona, its fans become evenenergized by their determination that this humiliation must not become the fate of their beloved team.Parks focuses occasionally on the players and the strange, totally soccer focused lives that they have lived since they first demonstrated football talent as young schoolchildren Immensely privileged, they are hopelessly deprived They have no ordinary life Above all, they are paid huge salaries p 205 but his main focus is on the fan experience Whenever fans of Hellas Verona, or any other Italian team, travel to a rival stadium to watch an away game, their arrival in town is treated like a barbarian invasion police escorts, segregated cars in trains, strictly limited areas where they can sit together in stadiums There is always the sense that all this football fandom could break out into real, brutal, large scale civic violence.At the same time, Parks takes advantage of the opportunity to relate the wild and unpredictable qualities of Italian football to what he has observed regarding Italian society generally In terms of parallels with politics, for example, it is fortunate that he was writing this book in the early 2000 s, when Silvio Berlusconi, a man with strong ties to both media and football, was moving toward victory in Italy s 2001 national election Strong parallels between Italian football and Italian national life also become apparent when Parks relates perceptions of unfair refereeing in football to the odd and arbitrary manner in which he has seen laws being enforced, or not being enforced, across ItalyIn any country there is a gap between formal boundaries and reality But the peculiarity of Italy lies in the exact balance between rival versions of the world, the equal intensity of people s emotional commitment to private loyalties and moral commitment to public justice Everyone wants their team to win at all costs and everyone earnestly wishes the world to be fair It s not an easy state of mind to administratep 299 All of this leads up to a delightful chapter titled Abandon All Hope, in which Parks evokes the inscription above the gates to Dante Alighieri s Inferno to describe the hell of fandom Mentioning, in the process, that as Dante s Inferno has 34 cantos, so the Italian football season is 34 weeks long, Parks describes the police escorted bus journey of Hellas fans to a crucial away game at Napoli, in terms that sound distinctly Dantean Guided by the police into the fenced in yard of an abandoned warehouse, the Hellas fans are told that they will have to wait there for hours in an area smelling of raw sewage until it is time for the game to begin Against this grim context, Parks reflects that We re like a group of sinners arriving in hell and finding it doesn t have adequate sanitary facilities Perhaps hell, it occurs to me, will be the ultimate away game, an interminable wait for a match that never begins in the circle of some infernal stadium, tormented by devils in the shape of policemen and opposing fans p 403.It is no wonder that, at this point in the season, Parks reflects that Hell never ends but the football season finally does p 419 or that, when the bus breaks down on the way back from Napoli to Verona, Parks asks, Oh where, I wonder, is that poet Virgil to lead us out of here p 403 Does the tragedy of relegation occur Does Hellas Verona get moved down to Serie B Do the team s avid fans have to endure the indignity of getting relegated while watching their cross town rivals Chievo Verona go up to Serie A You ll have to read the book to find out But A Season with Verona succeeds both as an exciting, outcome by outcome book of sports drama, and as a thoughtful ethnographic study of fan culture Parks may not have achieved his schoolboy dreams of becoming a star footballer for a top tier English club like Manchester United but he excels as a perceptive and evocative writer, and he certainly hits all of his goals here


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