Mail-Order Mysteries: Real Stuff from Old Comic Book Ads

Mail-Order Mysteries: Real Stuff from Old Comic Book Ads ➳ [Reading] ➶ Mail-Order Mysteries: Real Stuff from Old Comic Book Ads By Kirk Demarais ➩ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Rediscover your sense of wonder Generations of comic book readers remember the tantalizing promises of vintage novelty advertisements that offered authentic laser gun plans, x ray specs, and even foo Rediscover your sense Real Stuff Kindle Ò of wonder Generations of comic book readers remember the tantalizing promises of vintage novelty advertisements that offered authentic laser gun plans, x ray specs, and evenfoot tall monsters with glow in the dark eyes But what would you Mail-Order Mysteries: MOBI :Ê really get if you entrusted your hard earnedto the post officeMail Order Mysteries answers this question, revealing the amazing truths and agonizing exaggerations about the actual products marketed to kids in the s, s, and s Pop culture historian Kirk Demarais shares Mysteries: Real Stuff PDF Æ his astonishing collection, includingToy Soldiers in a Footlocker Count Dante s World s Deadliest Fighting Secrets GRIT Hercules Wrist Band Hypno Coin Life Size Monsters Mystic Smoke Sea Monkeys Soil From Dracula s Castle U Control Ghost Ventrilo Voice Throwerand many, many With thanextraordinary, peculiar, and downright fraudulent collectibles, Mail Order Mysteries is a must have book comic book fans everywhere Trust us.


10 thoughts on “Mail-Order Mysteries: Real Stuff from Old Comic Book Ads

  1. Rick Rick says:

    Cheesy ads promoting all sorts of questionable items have appeared throughout the history of comic books In the lavish Mail Order Mysteries, Demarais supplies a chronicle of thepopular and infamous products Farthan just a mere listing, each item includes the original ad, a picture of the actual item, and exploratory text broken into three or four parts WE IMAGINED, THEY SENT, BEHIND THE MYSTERY and CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Demarais starts with an exploration of the classic X Ray Spe Cheesy ads promoting all sorts of questionable items have appeared throughout the history of comic books In the lavish Mail Order Mysteries, Demarais supplies a chronicle of thepopular and infamous products Farthan just a mere listing, each item includes the original ad, a picture of the actual item, and exploratory text broken into three or four parts WE IMAGINED, THEY SENT, BEHIND THE MYSTERY and CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Demarais starts with an exploration of the classic X Ray Spex The ad promised Amazing X Ray Vision Instantly For 1, it claimed you could See through fingers through skin see yolk of egg see lead in pencil Demarais reveals every boy s belief about the product in the WE IMAGINED Glasses that enable you to see real skeletons and nudity In the THEY SENT segment he quickly debunked it, informing that the Spex were really eyewear stuffed with bird feathers The feathers created the illusion of seeing skeleton or the curve of a woman s body In BEHIND THE MYSTERY, Demarais tells us that creator Harold von Braunhut also created Sea Monkeys He closes the passages with CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Not X actly what we X pected, but they re X alted as the quintessential mail order novelty In 150 pages, Demarais covers legendary novelties and questionable products such as the 100 pc Toy Soldier Set, Grit newspapers, World s Deadliest Fighting Secrets, and the Polaris Nuclear Sub He often shares little known but interesting facts about the products, their companies and creators The only downside to this book is the lack of an index Demarais divides the book into eight subject sections making it difficult to locate something you read previously


  2. Peter Derk Peter Derk says:

    This guy actually got ahold of some of the bullshit they sold in old comics Most of which seemed to be things to see girls partially nude X Ray specs, hypnotizing discs Everyone would have saved a lot of time if they d just advertised X Ray specs and sent pornography Duh, you already work in the comic publishing industry Drop in the office across the hall, strike a deal, make it happen What else would people look at Bones and shit Who cares about that Some of my personal favorite items C This guy actually got ahold of some of the bullshit they sold in old comics Most of which seemed to be things to see girls partially nude X Ray specs, hypnotizing discs Everyone would have saved a lot of time if they d just advertised X Ray specs and sent pornography Duh, you already work in the comic publishing industry Drop in the office across the hall, strike a deal, make it happen What else would people look at Bones and shit Who cares about that Some of my personal favorite items CHARLES ATLAS FITNESS PROGRAMThe famous ad where the nerd gets sand kicked in his face, goes and gets ripped, and thenI can t remember the rest, but I think there s like a home invasion thing and the former nerd strangles his tormentor s father in front of him Something like that.What s really fucked up is that YOU CAN STILL BUY THIS SYSTEM It s 50, which is pretty damn outrageous if you ask me Orrrr, with a little hunting, you can find the thing online.My personal favorite exercises are blowing up your cheeks to exercise your face, lightly karate chopping your kidneys, and a neck exercise that results in a pose too explicit for my taste.HOW TO PERFORM STRONG MAN STUNTSThere wasn t a lot about this, but the one tidbit I liked was that you could soak limestone in water overnight and then smash it with your hand I would like to try this Is there still a market for trickster strongmen 7 FOOT MONSTER SIZE POSTERSHuge posters of skeletons or Frankenstein with glow in the dark eyes If you ever wondered if anyone ever gave ONE fuck about the people who ordered this stuff, these posters came in two pieces, and the glow in the dark eyes were stickers you had to punch out and stick on Best bit, the instructions said about the eyes and the leftover materials The remaining small pieces of material can be used in other spots if you like Wow Jackpot.There was also a hilarious Moon Monster poster, also in two pieces, and the lower half was differently scaled and didn t match the upper half.FLASHING EYESThis was my favorite The ad said you would get flashing eyes in the mail, as used by magicians.What you GOT was a piece of paper, and printed on it were these instructions Obtain some silver paper and cut two small triangles, like tiny slices of pie Okay, with you so far Thanks for explaining what triangles are in a way I can understand Stick one to each eye lid at the top, the pointed end down When they eyes are open they are not seen Now, by blinking the eyes with a spotlight or footlight shining on your face, they appear as streaks of lightning or sparks shooting from the eyes You sent away 50 cents, and 6 8 weeks later, when you were expecting to shoot lasers out of your goddamn eyes, this is what came A paper that said Tape foil to your eyes, kid, and go FUCK yourself, eh It s these things that I wonder how we ll ever explain to children born post internet


  3. Derrick Derrick says:

    A fun and informative read, with lots of photos that bring back memories As a child of the late 70 s and 80 s, I recognized nearly all of the products mentioned in this book I never bought them, but I read many a comic book ad Not true I did try to sell Olympic greeting cards one summer I deducted some stars because it s such a light book It took about 45 minutes to read through it all and would probably not have been worth my money had I bought it It might have benefited fromprod A fun and informative read, with lots of photos that bring back memories As a child of the late 70 s and 80 s, I recognized nearly all of the products mentioned in this book I never bought them, but I read many a comic book ad Not true I did try to sell Olympic greeting cards one summer I deducted some stars because it s such a light book It took about 45 minutes to read through it all and would probably not have been worth my money had I bought it It might have benefited fromproduct testimonials and childhood memories


  4. Eric Goldman Eric Goldman says:

    This is a well conceived and well executed book about the cheap novelties that were ubiquitously advertised in comic books and other kid oriented publications up through the 1980s I remember seeing these ads frequently as a kid The book shows the advertisement for each item and a photo of what the item actually looked like, and then describes what actually works and what doesn t The author also provides a sometimes cryptic bottom line assessment of whether the item delivered on the ad s promi This is a well conceived and well executed book about the cheap novelties that were ubiquitously advertised in comic books and other kid oriented publications up through the 1980s I remember seeing these ads frequently as a kid The book shows the advertisement for each item and a photo of what the item actually looked like, and then describes what actually works and what doesn t The author also provides a sometimes cryptic bottom line assessment of whether the item delivered on the ad s promise or not Looking at this collection of items through my modern perspective as an advertising law professor, two things really stood out First, the ads line drawings frequently and presumably deliberately omitted a lot of important detail that would affect the purchasing decision Second, the ads targeted kids In theory, today we would do a lotto protect kids from such predatory advertising Of course, even as a kid in the 1970s I knew that many of these claims probably weren t true though I often wished they would be In ourmodern ad saturated society, I d like to think that kids today are growing up to be even savvier evaluators of ad claims In my household, we ve frequently discussed how to be skeptical of advertiser claims, and I hope that similar conversations are taking place in other households.Because so many of the ads were grossly misleading, the ads apparently didn t contemplate many repeat purchases a tough business model where you re constantly needing to recruit a new crop of kid buyers Of course, there were probably some kids for whom hope springs eternal Even after a failed purchase, they probably couldn t resist thinking that the next time would be different Ultimately, the business relied on information scarcity, i.e., the inability of kid buyers to independently research if the items actually worked The Internet effectively destroys an advertising model like this There s no way the advertiser could get away with vague and inadequately detailed line drawings in an Instagram era, and now there would be dozens of YouTube videos showing how the item worked or didn t Better living through technology This book is terrific for any kid who grew up in a middle class household in the 1970s or earlier I and many of my peers didn t have the money to satisfy our curiosity about whether these items worked as advertised For a littlethan the combined price of a hovercraft and spy camera, we can now satisfy that curiosity albeit a few decades later I don t mean to spoil the fun, but the bottom line most items were a bust but not all of them, which makes for eveninteresting reading to discover the items that weren t total scams


  5. Melissa Bond Melissa Bond says:

    If you were a kid who owned even one comic book, then you likely dreamed of trying out one of the mail order gimmicks, if not begged for just one from your parents The only one I was ever able to try out was joining the Archie Club simply because it didn t cost a dime However, once I received my welcome packet, I realized my mother just might know what she s talking about when she said those ads were a waste of money, or time impatiently waiting for it arrive as in my case However, that didn If you were a kid who owned even one comic book, then you likely dreamed of trying out one of the mail order gimmicks, if not begged for just one from your parents The only one I was ever able to try out was joining the Archie Club simply because it didn t cost a dime However, once I received my welcome packet, I realized my mother just might know what she s talking about when she said those ads were a waste of money, or time impatiently waiting for it arrive as in my case However, that didn t stop me from buying a Sea Monkey kit the moment I saved enough of my allowance, which ended up causing me to have severe anxiety towards drinking water from the tap which has lasted still to this day That s when I knew my mother was right about those ads, but it didn t curb my curiosity The moment I saw this book, I just had to have it and there was no one stopping me It s a must read for those of us who wondered if we missed out on a chance to fly away to Mars by way of a hot air balloon with real kryptonite in our pockets


  6. Gary Anderson Gary Anderson says:

    If you ve spent any time at all in your life with comics, get ready for some nostalgia Mail Order Mysteries presents original comic book ads alongside photos of what actually arrived in the mail, accompanied by some clever descriptions of what the purchaser imagined and what the manufacturers sent.The opening and closing essays are insightful about why kids and grown ups were motivated to buy this stuff, and how and why times have changed.I clearly remember various relatives with subscription If you ve spent any time at all in your life with comics, get ready for some nostalgia Mail Order Mysteries presents original comic book ads alongside photos of what actually arrived in the mail, accompanied by some clever descriptions of what the purchaser imagined and what the manufacturers sent.The opening and closing essays are insightful about why kids and grown ups were motivated to buy this stuff, and how and why times have changed.I clearly remember various relatives with subscriptions to Grit, and I m pretty sure I was once the proud owner of a brood of Sea Monkeys Mail Order Mysteries made me think about these oddities and others that hadn t crossed my mind in a long time


  7. Therese Therese says:

    A guy tracked down all that weird cool stuff advertised in the back of comic books x ray specs, hypno coins, free one million in cash , so we can all finally see how badly we would have been ripped off Fun to read, fantastic photos of the less than impressive treasures, and explanations of how the magic you hoped was real actually worked when it DID work.But the best part, for me, was the afterword, where writer Jesse Thorn distills the sweet and sour sorrow of growing up Growing up is i A guy tracked down all that weird cool stuff advertised in the back of comic books x ray specs, hypno coins, free one million in cash , so we can all finally see how badly we would have been ripped off Fun to read, fantastic photos of the less than impressive treasures, and explanations of how the magic you hoped was real actually worked when it DID work.But the best part, for me, was the afterword, where writer Jesse Thorn distills the sweet and sour sorrow of growing up Growing up is in large part about adjusting to a narrowing of possibility With each year, we surrender what could have been Dead on


  8. Mark Mark says:

    Do any of you remember the mail order novelty ads in comic books from the 70 s and later Especially the big ones from Johnson Smith, or Fun Factory Did you ever wonder what the x ray specs really were Or sea monkeys Demarais did, and with the advent of Ebay, he began tracking down as many of the things he coveted as a youth as he could Eventually he wrote this book Each page has a picture of the original ad, a picture of what you got, and a paragraph or two explaining the trick, if there w Do any of you remember the mail order novelty ads in comic books from the 70 s and later Especially the big ones from Johnson Smith, or Fun Factory Did you ever wonder what the x ray specs really were Or sea monkeys Demarais did, and with the advent of Ebay, he began tracking down as many of the things he coveted as a youth as he could Eventually he wrote this book Each page has a picture of the original ad, a picture of what you got, and a paragraph or two explaining the trick, if there was one A really enjoyable book Recommended to all those who remember the sense of mystery that we lost, growing up


  9. Vince Ciaramella Vince Ciaramella says:

    What a fun book I read this in a day started and finished yesterday As a kid in the 80 s I remember these ads in the back of comic books I always wanted to order something but I never had the money because I spent it on other stupid things As an adult I finally got a pair of X Ray Specs and well, THEY ARE AWESOME This is a great book for anyone who didn t have the money to send away for itching powder, a vampire girl mask, spy camera, or.X RAY SPECS It tells you what the ad claimed What a fun book I read this in a day started and finished yesterday As a kid in the 80 s I remember these ads in the back of comic books I always wanted to order something but I never had the money because I spent it on other stupid things As an adult I finally got a pair of X Ray Specs and well, THEY ARE AWESOME This is a great book for anyone who didn t have the money to send away for itching powder, a vampire girl mask, spy camera, or.X RAY SPECS It tells you what the ad claimed and what you actually got Plus the book was like 12 so its cheap I will hold onto this and show my son when he s older I m sure the rubber vampire bat toy will still be around


  10. Fraser Sherman Fraser Sherman says:

    I m not sure this will have the same kick for anyone who didn t grow up reading comics when the back page ads offered X ray spectacles, martial arts handbooks, Polaris submarines and a throw your voice gadget for instant ventriloquism Demarais went out and ordered dozens of these items on ebay and details the history, the ads, and how the products actually worked surprisingly some of them did A real hoot.


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