Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail PDF


    Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail PDF Biological psychiatry had triumphed Except maybe it hadn t Starting with surprising evidence from the World Health Organisation that suggests people recover better from mental illness in a developing country than in the first world, Doctoring the Mind asks the question how good are our mental health services, really Richard Bentall picks apart the science that underlies current psychiatric practice across the US and UK Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty first century."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 388 pages
  • Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail
  • Richard P. Bentall
  • English
  • 04 October 2018

10 thoughts on “Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail

  1. Trevor Trevor says:

    What is madness This is not nearly as easy a question to answer as you might think Firstly, you might want to say that to be mad is to act in a way that is different from those around you but you might also want to say that acting differently to those around you is often a pretty good definition of being sane too Okay, so perhaps you could say that being mad is to act irrationally, but again, one man s reason is another woman s insanity, so who is to judge If you were a psychiatrist you mi What is madness This is not nearly as easy a question to answer as you might think Firstly, you might want to say that to be mad is to act in a way that is different from those around you but you might also want to say that acting differently to those around you is often a pretty good definition of being sane too Okay, so perhaps you could say that being mad is to act irrationally, but again, one man s reason is another woman s insanity, so who is to judge If you were a psychiatrist you might want to say that madness is a genetic dysfunction causing an imbalance of brain chemicals that causes predictable behavioural abnormalities and mental states, both of which can effectively be addressed through appropriate drug therapies That is, chemical imbalance in brain needs to be re balanced using drugs This book is mostly opposed to precisely this definition of madness.I have known for years that there was a serious turf war between psychiatrists and psychologists Having studied philosophy I have generally thought both sides to be nutcases andin need of treatment than being allowed to treat others This book calls into question the whole idea behind psychiatry and I think very convincingly It also makes me very, very glad that I do not have a mental illness, at least, not one evident enough to make me conspicuous to these bastards.The medical paradigm that diseases including mental ones first need to be diagnosed given a name , before a prognosis how long you are likely to be sick can be given and a treatment strategy developed to show a pathway to wellness has proven to be remarkably poor at improving mental illness In fact, while medical science has measurably improved the lot of cancer sufferers and heart attack victims, the lot of the mentally ill has not really improved at all over the last century This should be a scandal, but instead it is passed over mostly in silence.Let me start by saying that I do believe people suffer from mental illnesses and also believe things can and should be done to help these people but I also want to stress that the medical paradigm I would prefer to see applied in such cases is the one that says, First, do no harm This has not been something the history of psychiatry can proudly point to It has been a history of disgusting human experimentation, and not just in Nazi Germany lobotomy, insulin shock, electric shocks to the brain, barbaric surgery including genital mutilation and punishing incarceration are but the tip of a very deep iceberg A history such as this ought to give society reason to pause, but its current excesses, particularly in the use of chemicals to treat illness, show, if nothing else, that we learn nothing from history.Most people would agree that if you are mad it must have something to do with your brain and that to fix the problem will involve somehow fixing your brain But what could be wrong with your brain When psychologists first went looking they hoped to find something big and obvious like an on off switch in the head conveniently turned to Off at least as obvious as the symptoms they saw manifested Illnesses such as schizophrenia and bi polar disorder are mentioned so often that you might assume that these are clearly defined and easily recognised disorders Nothing could be further from the truth There is little agreement about what constitutes any mental illness A better path than the one we are on at present would be to see such disorders not as convenient boxes to place people into, but as spectrum disorders where the boundaries between normal and ill are not at all easy to define.Except that we do have a preference for believing in the all powerful gene This is another myth that is attacked in this book Once again the tricks and lies of those who are obsessed with finding genetic causes to every complaint, real or imagined, is displayed in stark relief I would suggest that if someone tells you that something even as innocuous as the fact that hair colour has a genetic basis that you would be better off doubting them better to doubt than to end up believing half of the nonsense that passes for the science of genetics oh Mr Pinker, that includes you The infinite evil that has been perpetrated in that science s name is once again documented and what a sorry history it has been.I had no idea how much money drug companies make out of the drugs they peddle how infinitely profitable making the lives of the mentally ill evenmiserable could be Come the revolution, of course, we are going to need a particularly long wall The chapters in this book on how psychiatry has become an aloof medical science not so much interested in the patient as in their symptoms and even then only in how to stuff them full of expensive drugs that chemically lobotomise them is infuriating Apparently, drug companies make up the ten most profitable companies on the Fortune 100 and, although they claim to need to make the obscene profits they make to help them develop new andeffective drugs, actually most of the private money used in developing drugs is to make drugs that are chemically similar to already existing ones to get around patent laws Most new drugs are developed using public money These companies spend muchon advertising than on developing drugs If you needed a synonym of evil then multi national pharmaceutical company would be as good as any other.There are heavy duty backers to the idea that mental illness is a medical condition that needs to be treated using drugs follow the cash This book, referenced to within an inch of its life, points out that on virtually every level the assumptions psychiatry makes about mental illness are both wrong and increase the suffering of those unfortunate enough to be treated according to this paradigm I don t know if treating people in the manner the author suggests that is, with kindness while seeking to understand the patient would be an effective treatment or not but by god it seems to make a hell of a lotsense and cause a hell of a lot less damage than what has been tried to date.This is a fascinating, important and infuriating book If you are even a little bit interested in this subject I can t recommend it too highly


  2. Muriel (The Purple Book Wyrm) Muriel (The Purple Book Wyrm) says:

    I ll preface this by saying that I really appreciate the fact the author had the honesty of admitting the presence of personal bias in favour of clinical psychology It really helped me to moderate my annoyance at some parts of this book Thank you.I ll also add that I m writing this as a person who has suffered from chronic depression since the age of twelve, and been treated in a non anglo saxon EU country As such, my experience of psychiatry has not been absolutely dominated by Big Pharma t I ll preface this by saying that I really appreciate the fact the author had the honesty of admitting the presence of personal bias in favour of clinical psychology It really helped me to moderate my annoyance at some parts of this book Thank you.I ll also add that I m writing this as a person who has suffered from chronic depression since the age of twelve, and been treated in a non anglo saxon EU country As such, my experience of psychiatry has not been absolutely dominated by Big Pharma thank goodness I ve been researching psychiatry, anti psychiatry, and looking to critical psychiatry for a while now and thus took to reading this book with a pinch of salt at the ready I was ready to dump it before even starting it when I saw a review mentioning it as a great asset to the anti psychiatry movement I really have no patience for it A lot of it is made up of fanatics who cry pseudo science at psychiatry when they themselves know little about the nuances of scientific research, or the complexity of it when it adresses the amazing organ that is the brain A lot of them are also mental illness denialists who have nocompassion for sufferers than the pharmadocs they despise so much But I decided to give the book a try anyway Now that I ve finished, I m pretty confident that the author is not, in fact, really anti psychiatry Although this was absolutely not apparent at first or even at middle I ll come back to that I ll start with what I enjoyed about the book 1 The historical information was very interesting good History is always fun , and though I knew a bit of it already, I enjoyed learning new things I was somewhat familiar with Kraepelin and Meyer, but have now a much clearer understanding of their founding roles in psychiatric thought theory 2 The author presented a very clear and concise analysis of antidepressant and antipsychotic research Confirming what I already knew and or suspected regarding long term use of psych meds, from the useless to the outright dangerous 3 There were interesting tidbits about the current theoretical frameworks used to understand the different aspects of psychosis, which I found really convincing Although I don t see how these psychological mechanisms exclude the role of intrinsic biology for some people 4 His concluding chapter envisioning a holistic, psychobiosocial reform for the treatment of mental illness, and the maintenance of good mental health Ironically though, that last point is problematic for two reasons a I know for a fact that this method is already being put into practice, and has been for some time Since I encountered it both when I was in hospital at age 12, and when I went back last year I m now 25 As far as I know, the multidisciplinary approach is the only one to be found in my city, even my country So clearly, on an international level in developed countries , we re dealing with a straw man here If he were talking exclusively about the US, or even Britain though even according to him it s not as bad , then yes, I would concur Although not entirely either since I ve read several accounts of good care in the USA as well On the other hand, I will certainly agree that the influence of Big Pharma is ever growing, again especially in the States, it s HQ b That last chapter s tone in particular seemed to be in direct conflict with most of the rest of the book s But even throughout, the author s contradictory feelings and conclusions were really grating at times Which brings me to what I didn t like about this book 1 The author s inconsistency It s as if he couldn t really make up his mind about his feelings and conclusions regarding psychiatry Honestly, if I hadn t finished the book, I would ve come away with the conclusion that he was the definitely part of what I call the Church of Psychotherapy branch of the anti psychiatry movement But the book s last chapter was really quite beautifully nuanced, so I ve decided he sin the critical psychiatry camp though in aclearly biased way than I am myself 2 The differing amount of detail awarded to his critiques of medication and therapy The author does a pretty decent job of critiquing the role of medication in the treatment of mental illness, but clearly didn t go in as deep with psychotherapy not as many notes and references, for one This is probably the result of his personal bias And while he getsnuanced towards the end of his book, most of his remarks regarding meds vs mostly CBT, big surprise psychotherapy are just too black and white Either medication is a spectacular failure unworthy of further research which I find disturbingly unscientific to say , or psychotherapy undoubtedly demonstrates very high amounts of success Which is all theconfusing when he admits, on the very same page, that conducting objective research on it s efficacy is evendifficult than it is for psychopharmacology 3 I found some of the evidence unconvincing In fact, I find it funny that, despite looking at the same data, the author and I came to different conclusions as to their meaning for patient care I also found some of his interpretations to be based on faulty premises, chiefly that the mind and brain are separate, and that just because something can be influenced, even caused by our environment and life circumstances, it means it s all about nurture and not about nature i.e mis wiring of the brain Again, he seemed to agree with me on this one towards the end of the book, so maybe this is all a question of either poor writing, or poor editing 4 Putting what I mentioned about the author s contradictions aside, I was also annoyed about what seems to be a generalised misunderstanding of the role of genetics and brain structure in all of this Genetic predispositions for mental illness and many others, I might add don t automatically lead to actual mental illness In fact, epigenetics, an eveninteresting field of study to me, would agree that genes clearly have a complex relationship with our environment and life circumstances There is no mutual exclusion here The same goes with brain structure and even brain chemistry, to a certain extent, although I don t subscribe to the chemical imbalance theory either, it s too simple , which can and is affected by our life experiences Ever heard of neuro plasticity Is it so unreasonable to think that trauma, or repeated negative experiences, can shape neural pathways and biochemical mechanisms in such a way as to make it increasingly difficult to get out of toxic, depressed, anxious, even psychotic, thought patterns and processes Which is also why I m convinced CBT alone will not work with severe long term mental illness, certainly not if it lasts a mere 6 months Is it so unreasonable to think that some people have genes that, if activated by certain life events, will make the development of mental illnesslikely orsevere Otherwise, you would see the same reactions or lack thereof in people who ve had bad experiences And you wouldn t find family trees with a ridiculous amount of actual mental illness either 5 The straw manning, which I ve already mentioned a A lot of the faults attributed to psychiatry can be attributed to other branches of medicine the author does acknowledge this, so I wasn t so annoyed by this by the end of the book b Like I said, I ve never encountered a psychiatrist who said that mental illnesses are genetically determined diseases of the brain Never Not once I m not saying they don t exist, but clearly that statement doesn t represent a universally agreed upon consensus c Different branches of medicine have also caused incredible harm andimportantly, taken time to get where they are today The first example that comes to mind is the field of oncology In fact, cancer research still has a long way to go Imagine then, what this means for the branches of medicine psychiatry and neurology, which should perhaps fuse in some cases that study the most complex organ we have Of course we re not there yet We needresearch, not less To say that, just because we haven t found enough convincing evidence for the biological underpinnings a better word than causes of mental illness, we should abandon all research is downright shameful coming from the mouth of a scientific researcher If science should only to be conducted when there is an assurance of finding an immediate application, then theoretical physics departments, for example, should all be shut down 6 The naivet of the author regarding the importance of a warm and caring relationship between a psychotherapist and his her patient I mean, really That we need decent human relationships with our doctors and therapist is pretty self evident Bedside manners are fundamental, compassion should be a requirement But it only goes so far It s not a panacea Moreover, it will always be fake, to a degree Why Because money is involved It might be a very cynical way of seeing it, but I think it s realistic Money doesn t prevent someone from caring or being kind, of course But it puts up a barrier that needs to be recognised A shrink is basically a friendship prostitute note, I have nothing against prostitution If you re lucky, they ll have actual therapeutical tools, backed by at least some theory and evidence, that can help Although you might as well buy a CBT workbook and do it yourself But this is why I disagree with the Dodo conjecture Simply being nice to your patient client, and taking 30 40 from them which in my country, is not even covered by healthcare is not going to improve their symptoms or quality of life, not on the long term at least To think otherwise is ridiculous If it s that simple, why can people with relatively good life circumstances still suffer from mental illness Conversely, why aren t sufferers automatically cured as soon as their life circumstances improve 7 The author s qualms with classification This didn t bother me too much to be honest I get it I hate the DSM too But I don t think attempts at classification are entirely misguided again, there have been issues with this in other branches of medicine The real problem with the DSM is that it is used as a bible, not as a set of guidelines, and that it s been heavily corrupted by Big Pharma And yes, discrete categories can be problematic, although if the author dislikes them so much, why does he insist on separating symptoms and quality of life as if they had nothing to do with each other Like I said, I liked his concluding chapter Well, except when he lapsed back into mental illness is all nurture mode and said that it basically boils down to problems with human relationships it s almost as bad as the it s the mother s fault explanation for autism I mean, yes, they re very important The world is rife with problems Kindness is in short supply But until we get the Revolution going, simple answers to the complex issues of mental illness simply won t work I should know Psychotherapy can be just as good, just as bad, and just as useless as medication, for different people Okay, granted, antipsychotics are probablyphysiologically dangerous than any kind of therapy except when it s so pointless that the patient, stuck with despair, ends up killing himself Psychiatry has not crushed my hopes It simply hasn t given me any There s a significant difference here And it s as true for medications as it is for psychotherapy In my case, they re both, largely, BS Not entirely, but largely I firmly believe that the holistic approach to psychiatry and medicine in general, really is the best one As of now, it s woefully incomplete and short sighted We needresearch yes, ,for every aspect of the problem on brain function and the emergence of what we call the mind Neuro plasticity, I think, holds the key for many sufferers Which is why I look up to psychedelic medicine as the potential redeemer of psychobiosocial psychiatry No to mention it s the only thing giving me any substantial hope right now


  3. Kira Kira says:

    This book is highly accessible and accomplished piece of writing which stands out because of Bentall s uncompromising courage to take on some of the most strongly held beliefs concerning both psychological and psychiatric treatments of mental illness The author depicts some of these current approaches as moments of distorted, premature hubris which pose the risk of being extremely harmful in the long run This view is backed with ongoing review of scientific research, and it should be noted tha This book is highly accessible and accomplished piece of writing which stands out because of Bentall s uncompromising courage to take on some of the most strongly held beliefs concerning both psychological and psychiatric treatments of mental illness The author depicts some of these current approaches as moments of distorted, premature hubris which pose the risk of being extremely harmful in the long run This view is backed with ongoing review of scientific research, and it should be noted that the narrative remains neutral throughout, steering clear of scaremongering As a whole, this book presents a rather unpleasant picture of how the pursuit of prestige commonly associated with medicine can ultimately lead to detrimental results in the field of mental health.Very refreshing and thought provoking read


  4. Neal Alexander Neal Alexander says:

    My edition is subtitled Why psychiatric treatments fail So, why do they _If_ they do, that is, which isn t always The book s answer is that such treatments are aimed a supposed chemical imbalance, rather than a person whose condition is part of their personal and economic circumstances I agree with almost everything in the book but it s not very original In the final chapters he propounds what he calls the autonomy promoting model of psychiatric care e.g the right to decline trea My edition is subtitled Why psychiatric treatments fail So, why do they _If_ they do, that is, which isn t always The book s answer is that such treatments are aimed a supposed chemical imbalance, rather than a person whose condition is part of their personal and economic circumstances I agree with almost everything in the book but it s not very original In the final chapters he propounds what he calls the autonomy promoting model of psychiatric care e.g the right to decline treatment as opposed to the current paternalistic medical one He s mentioned Thomas Szasz a few times earlier, but here the sentence These arguments are not mere philosophical posturing they are utilitarian and practial is footnoted My approach is therefore somewhat different from that of Thomas Szasz, whose objections to coercion seem to be based on a deontological conception of human rights Anyone familiar with Szasz life and work will know that the implication of mere posturing is false, so this passage comes over as a failed attempt to get out if his shadow


  5. Doreen Doreen says:

    Excellent and would be worrying if you did not already suspect that medication outruns the evidence to support its use The upshot is that theintrusive treatments have in the past been held to be helpful when they were not leucotomy, insulin coma, ECT and that drug treatments are often pursued at damaging levels since individual variation is not adequately allowed for Talking therapies are less intrusive but there is no evidence that any one sort works better than any other sort and perh Excellent and would be worrying if you did not already suspect that medication outruns the evidence to support its use The upshot is that theintrusive treatments have in the past been held to be helpful when they were not leucotomy, insulin coma, ECT and that drug treatments are often pursued at damaging levels since individual variation is not adequately allowed for Talking therapies are less intrusive but there is no evidence that any one sort works better than any other sort and perhaps the magic ingredient is kindness Many people have symptoms similar to those demmed mentally ill, without ever feeling the need of a psychiatric service A bithumility all round would seem to be the order of the day


  6. Demetrelli Demetrelli says:

    I bought this book for its antipsychiatric spirit and now I simply love it for the philosophical, practical and clinical questions it poses for psychology Bentall has managed through a great structure and sequence of his thinking to take the reader even one who is not professionally connected to psychology from the origins of the antipsychiatric movement to the modern day applications in autonomy enhancing facilities services I was impressed by the body of literature he presents to support h I bought this book for its antipsychiatric spirit and now I simply love it for the philosophical, practical and clinical questions it poses for psychology Bentall has managed through a great structure and sequence of his thinking to take the reader even one who is not professionally connected to psychology from the origins of the antipsychiatric movement to the modern day applications in autonomy enhancing facilities services I was impressed by the body of literature he presents to support his arguements He also doesn t hesitate to comment on those parts who are missing or problematic for both sides of the psych med debate.His criticism on prescribing psychiatric medicine is not merely ethical humanistic as was the one by Thomas Szasz, but extends to the politics of pharmaceutical industries with their profit oriented goals and the deep undoubtedly political wish of psychiatrists to hold their status quo in the field of mental health Nevertheless, Bentall is never dogmatic and recognizes the benevolent intent of psychiatrists to help their patients Further I loved the way he deconstructs the claim that psychiatric meds actually improve the life of a patient in contrast to the seemingly unsupported results of psychotherapy Through a lengthy presentation of clinical trials it might have been the only tiring part of the book the writer proves that psychotherapy is not hokus pokus and has substantial characteristics that can apply to every day relationships and help a patient live a functional, happy life.I could write a ten page review on all my thoughts regarding this book and I still wouldn t be done.If you are hoping to become a psychologist, I suggest you read this


  7. Jesus (Ego) Jesus (Ego) says:

    Pocos libros hay tan valientes, documentados y que adem s sean tan amenos y digeribles como este Bentall sabe de lo que habla y lo dice muy bien Me gusta c mo explica la historia de la psiquiatr a y sus desafortunadas idas y venidas, c mo la diferencia de la psicolog a cl nica, como defiende un uso racional de los psicof rmacos y la necesidad aumentar las psicoterapias y los aspectos psicosociales en el tratamiento de los trastornos mentales graves, es sublime c mo expone las malas artes de la Pocos libros hay tan valientes, documentados y que adem s sean tan amenos y digeribles como este Bentall sabe de lo que habla y lo dice muy bien Me gusta c mo explica la historia de la psiquiatr a y sus desafortunadas idas y venidas, c mo la diferencia de la psicolog a cl nica, como defiende un uso racional de los psicof rmacos y la necesidad aumentar las psicoterapias y los aspectos psicosociales en el tratamiento de los trastornos mentales graves, es sublime c mo expone las malas artes de las grandes farmac uticas y c mo ahonda en las alucinaciones y delirios, centr ndose en explicaciones alternativas y necesarias a la simple qu mica cerebral Tiene tantos datos y tantas opiniones interesantes este libroSe lo recomendar a a todo el mundo pero, aun estando escrito de manera sencilla y con intenci n divulgativa, parece estar orientado a profesionales de la salud mental y afines No obstante, si te gusta lo que te cuento y quieres profundizar un poco en estos temas, seas curioso, profesional o paciente adelante, ponte a leer este libro No te arrepentir s


  8. Beverley Smith Beverley Smith says:

    Doctoring the Mind by Richard P Bentall is a book of big words and lots of them Although a densely packed book it full of insight Benthall is a research psychologist and goes through the history of psychiatric treatments in relation to psychotic illnesses, such as bi polar and schizophrenia, although he does touch upon depression What if any benefit these treatments have had on the patient in the past or even now From the early days of Freud, asylums and Elective Convulsive Therapy to the in Doctoring the Mind by Richard P Bentall is a book of big words and lots of them Although a densely packed book it full of insight Benthall is a research psychologist and goes through the history of psychiatric treatments in relation to psychotic illnesses, such as bi polar and schizophrenia, although he does touch upon depression What if any benefit these treatments have had on the patient in the past or even now From the early days of Freud, asylums and Elective Convulsive Therapy to the introduction of psychotic drugs, such as Chlorpromazine and back to the kindly face and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, he covers the lot and does so very well I think this book should be read by anyone who is directly involved with people who have suffered a psychotic episode This could mean the medical staff or even the relatives or the patients He leaves us with the question What kind of Psychiatry do you want


  9. Michael Kubat Michael Kubat says:

    Thein work in the so called helping so called professions, theI am convinced that Bentall s critique in right on the money.


  10. Ann Ann says:

    A must for those who question the medical model of mental illness and those who don t


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Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail❮PDF / Epub❯ ✈ Doctoring the mind : why psychiatric treatments fail ⚣ Author Richard P. Bentall – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Towards the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found It lay in biological solutions, focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or impro Towards the end of mind : PDF/EPUB ¶ the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found It lay in biological solutions, Doctoring the eBook Ì focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or improved through drugs We entered the Prozac Age the mind : Epub Ý and believed we had moved on definitively from the time of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare Biological psychiatry had triumphed Except maybe it hadn t Starting with surprising evidence from the World Health Organisation that suggests people recover better from mental illness in a developing country than in the first world, Doctoring the Mind asks the question how good are our mental health services, really Richard Bentall picks apart the science that underlies current psychiatric practice across the US and UK Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty first century.


About the Author: Richard P. Bentall

Is a well known mind : PDF/EPUB ¶ author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Doctoring the mind : Doctoring the eBook Ì why psychiatric treatments fail book, this is one of the most wanted Richard P Bentall author readers around the world.