Crécy 1346: Triumph of the longbow Kindle ê 1346:

Crécy 1346: Triumph of the longbow ❮Download❯ ➵ Crécy 1346: Triumph of the longbow Author David Nicolle – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The Battle of Crecy was the first major land battle of the Hundred Years War It pitted the French army, then considered the best in Europe, and their miscellaneous allies against the English under K The Battle of Triumph of Kindle Ø Crecy was the first major land battle of the Hundred Years War It pitted the French army, then considered the best in Europe, and their miscellaneous allies against the English under King Edward Crécy 1346: PDF/EPUB ² III and the Black Prince , who as yet had no great military reputation this was the battle where he won his spurs The Genoese crossbowmen were outshot by the English longbows and the pattern was set 1346: Triumph of MOBI õ for the rest of the day the French cavalry were committed piecemeal in fruitless charges against strong English positions, losing perhaps , men in the course of the fighting After almost a millennium in which cavalry had dominated the field of battle, the infantryman, and particularly the longbowman, now ruled supreme.


10 thoughts on “Crécy 1346: Triumph of the longbow

  1. Glyn Glyn says:

    This offers a clear and simple introduction to the complexity of the Hundred Years War.Nicolle, a noted military historian with a long history with Osprey Publishhng, does the honours here provided a lucid and easy to follow introduction before taking us through the invasion, the fighting at Caen and the French response to the humiliation of English troops ravaging their soil For so well known a battle as Crecy, it may be surprising to learn that there remain significant areas of historical dou This offers a clear and simple introduction to the complexity of the Hundred Years War.Nicolle, a noted military historian with a long history with Osprey Publishhng, does the honours here provided a lucid and easy to follow introduction before taking us through the invasion, the fighting at Caen and the French response to the humiliation of English troops ravaging their soil For so well known a battle as Crecy, it may be surprising to learn that there remain significant areas of historical doubt Wisely, given the limited page count available, Nicolle does not delve deeply into what the actual strategy Edward III was employing raid or invasion was That would take a farin depth study to give due credit to it s importanceThe centrepoint is of course the battle and the destruction of the French nobility which he describes well Having already, as per the format detailed the armies and their make up, the account of them in action is highly satisfying.This like all this series is a brief inftroduction and inspires the reader to dig deeper


  2. John John says:

    The mists of time are somewhat thick around the early stages of the Hundred Years War There are conflicting accounts and gaps in the evidence we do not even know if, when Edward III landed in Normandy in 1346, he intended a conquest or merely a grand chevauch e David Nicolle takes the opposite view on almost all the contentious questions to Burne in his classic account of the war Whereas Burne painted Edward as a great strategist surrounded by talented officers up against a weakling, Philip The mists of time are somewhat thick around the early stages of the Hundred Years War There are conflicting accounts and gaps in the evidence we do not even know if, when Edward III landed in Normandy in 1346, he intended a conquest or merely a grand chevauch e David Nicolle takes the opposite view on almost all the contentious questions to Burne in his classic account of the war Whereas Burne painted Edward as a great strategist surrounded by talented officers up against a weakling, Philip VI, aided, mostly, by nincompoops, Nicolle sees Edward asfavoured by fortune and Philip as rather shrewd While the truth undoubtedly lies somewhere between the two, I can t help feeling it lies closer to Burne than Nicolle Take two examples There is an old story that Genoese crossbowmen at Cr cy were hindered by the strings on their bows getting wet Burne discounts this, saying that professional soldiers would have known how to keep their equipment in working order in the face of a common event like rain, as the English longbowmen did Nicolle, by contrast, credits the story, pointing out that it isdifficult to remove the string from a crossbow than from a longbow True, but I still think, as Burne argues, that professional, mercenary soldiers would have known how to deal with this Second, the day after Cr cy, a French force arrived from Abbeville and was seen off in short order In Nicolle s narrative, they arrived on the battlefield in ignorance of the events of the day before and were surprised by the English Burne, however, makes the point that the roads in every direction after a debacle like Cr cy, would have been packed with survivors, with the road to Abbeville being no exception Again, I find Burne s versionconvincing This is a decent introduction to the battle of Cr cy, but given the differing interpretations of it, it is best read in conjunction with another


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