The Last Days of Pompeii MOBI í The Last MOBI


The Last Days of Pompeii ✹ The Last Days of Pompeii Epub ✼ Author Edward Bulwer-Lytton – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The Last Days of Pompeii was one of the most popular English historical novels of the nineteenth century It tells the story of the virtuous Greeks Glaucus and Ione, their escape from Pompeii amid the Days of ePUB ¹ The Last Days of Pompeii was one of the most popular English historical novels of the nineteenth century It tells the story of the virtuous Greeks Glaucus and Ione, their escape from Pompeii amid the eruption of Vesuvius inCE, and their eventual conversion to Christianity, against a background of Roman decadence and corrupt Eastern religion.

  • Hardcover
  • 496 pages
  • The Last Days of Pompeii
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • English
  • 12 February 2017

About the Author: Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Days of ePUB ¹ Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Lytton, st Baron Lytton PC, was an English novelist, poet, playwright, and politician Lord Lytton was a florid, popular writer of his day, who coined such phrases as the great unwashed , pursuit of the almighty dollar , the pen is mightier than the sword , and the infamous incipit It was a dark and The Last MOBI :Ê stormy night He was the youngest son of General William Earle Bulwer of Heydon Hall and Wood Dalling, Norfolk and Elizabeth Barbara Lytton, daughter of Richard Warburton Lytton of Knebworth, Hertfordshire He had two brothers, William Earle Lytton Bulwer and Henry, afterwards Lord Dalling and BulwerLord Lytton s original surname was Bulwer, the names Earle and Lytton were middle Last Days of PDF/EPUB é names On February he assumed the name and arms of Lytton by royal licence and his surname then became Bulwer Lytton His widowed mother had done the same in His brothers were always simply surnamed Bulwer.



10 thoughts on “The Last Days of Pompeii

  1. Kara Kara says:

    A veiled Roman lady walks down the cobble stone street of ancient Pompeii She smiles when she sees her friend and modestly removes only half her veil to greet her in front of the House of the Tragic Poet, a name that will be conferred upon it seventeen centuries hence O friend By wise Juno, how are you Alas and alack, dear friend This day I am forced to place a one star review on Goodreads By the gods this is sore news indeed Why The melodramatic overacting of the main characters A veiled Roman lady walks down the cobble stone street of ancient Pompeii She smiles when she sees her friend and modestly removes only half her veil to greet her in front of the House of the Tragic Poet, a name that will be conferred upon it seventeen centuries hence O friend By wise Juno, how are you Alas and alack, dear friend This day I am forced to place a one star review on Goodreads By the gods this is sore news indeed Why The melodramatic overacting of the main characters is quite, quite terrible Everything they say, by thunderous Jove, is exclaimed upon But but, by Vulcan s forge, a volcano ruins their whole world, is that not enough reason to be dramatic Not when the volcano erupts in only the last ten of 400 pages The women stand and, with nervous hands, twist at the edges of their stola, a garment that was a long, pleated dress, worn over an undergarment called a tunica intima The stola was generally sleeveless but versions of it did have short or long sleeves These sleeves could belong to the stola itself or be a part of the tunic The traditional sleeveless gown was fastened by clasps at the shoulder called fibulae The stola was typically girt with ribbons, and typically had two belts The first was worn just below the upper chest creating a great number of folds The second and wider belt was worn around the waist Stolas were generally made of fabrics like linen or wool, but a wealthy woman could be seen wearing a stola made of silk Well then, you must at least then get a good day in the life examination of the ancient city Nay Tis a horrible Victorian soap opera of halfhearted assassinations and chaste love affairs O alas That such a tale is wrecked in the telling Alas By Mercury

  2. Gabrielle Dubois Gabrielle Dubois says:

    A sympathetic book for teenagers from 11 years old It is difficult to get in the Pompeian world of the year 79 AD The author describes little clothing, architecture, or daily life of the inhabitants of Pompeii I guess it must be difficult to immerse yourself in Pompeii of the 1st century if you do not already know History.To the credit of the author who wrote this book in the 19th century, we now know now a lotabout this period, so he did with the docs he had, I guess For example, I vi A sympathetic book for teenagers from 11 years old It is difficult to get in the Pompeian world of the year 79 AD The author describes little clothing, architecture, or daily life of the inhabitants of Pompeii I guess it must be difficult to immerse yourself in Pompeii of the 1st century if you do not already know History.To the credit of the author who wrote this book in the 19th century, we now know now a lotabout this period, so he did with the docs he had, I guess For example, I visited the Coliseum in Rome last year I learned a lot about gladiators, and that s different from what Mr Bulwer Lytton shows.This said, the story is nice and the characters are good It s worth meeting Julia, Glaucus, Ione Nydia, the young blind slave is an interesting girl.The Egyptian priest Arbaces is an awful villain who does not believe in the Gods which he wants people to believe in He manipulates the people He says I give to the world wisdom, to myself freedom But his tricks in his temple seemed to me like cardboard 50 s Hollywood decor.A weird thing I noticed The Titan wine vender seized the hand extended to him, and griped it in so stern a vice that the blood spirted from the fingers ends over the garments of the bystanders Is this really possible I can t say unless one of you would like to let me try with his hand and a beautiful one Like the rainbow, Peace rests upon the earth, but its arch is lost in heaven Heaven bathes it in hues of ligh t it springs up amidst tears and clouds it is a reflection of the Eternal Sun it is an assurance of calm it is the sign of a great covenant between Man and God Such peace, O young man is the smile of the soul it is an emanation from the distant orb of immortal light PEACE be with you Finally, I couldn t get into this story Maybe I m too tired, these days, I don t know.But I couldn t stop thinking about the beautiful Arria Marcella by Th ophile Gautier Nothing can be compared to this, but nothing can be compared to Theophile Gautier, so

  3. Stacey Stacey says:

    I read this perhaps 25 years ago, but just downloaded a copy, not remembering that I m already familiar with it The opening lines reminded me Of course, being so long ago, I don t remember a lot about the reading good reason to revisit the book, but it did make quite an impression on me Since I was a teenager, I ve watched many documentaries that reference Pompeii, and have a fascination with volcanoes In 1980, Mt St Helens erupted, the top 1 3 of the mountain disappearing in a moment I I read this perhaps 25 years ago, but just downloaded a copy, not remembering that I m already familiar with it The opening lines reminded me Of course, being so long ago, I don t remember a lot about the reading good reason to revisit the book, but it did make quite an impression on me Since I was a teenager, I ve watched many documentaries that reference Pompeii, and have a fascination with volcanoes In 1980, Mt St Helens erupted, the top 1 3 of the mountain disappearing in a moment I was 9 years old We were near enough to the mountain to see it, but far enough away to make the catastrophe only a moderate inconvenience I remember standing on my Aunt s back deck and watching the ash plume drifting east Over the next several weeks, ash settled on everything, and our neighbors closer to the volcano had to cope with ashy air, ash in and on all of their possessions, unreliable transportation, and property damage 57 people died DIED, in spite of massive warnings from scientists watching the mountain s activity Spirit Lake all but disappeared, poisoned by gas and debris, clogged with ash It was an incredible thing to witness especially for a 10 year old Sometime thereafter, I found The Last Days of Pompeii at the library, and devoured it In glancing over it again, I m not sure how my middle school mind took in the archaic language, but having been raised on a steady diet of daily bible readings, I suspect I wasused to it than I would be now I do remember the story being a fascinating look at the day to day lives of a somewhat decadent Greco Roman city There were elements of influence from other cultures and religions also, which made the story eveninteresting to me as a child, steeped as I was in fundamentalism It was a rare peek into other philosophies, couched in historical fiction Perhaps on re reading, it wouldn t stand up to my early experience Still, I think I ll give it a shot

  4. Brad Hodges Brad Hodges says:

    Once wildly popular, Baron Edward Bulwer Lytton is now best know for a couple of his quotes One is the pen is mightier than the sword, which is often used the other is the opening to his novel Paul Clifford It was a dark and stormy night, which was later used by Charles Schulz in Peanuts, with Snoopy s attempts at writing a novel always starting with that line.In 1834 Bulwer Lytton published The Last Days of Pompeii, a potboiler about the days leading up the August 14, 79 AD eruption of M Once wildly popular, Baron Edward Bulwer Lytton is now best know for a couple of his quotes One is the pen is mightier than the sword, which is often used the other is the opening to his novel Paul Clifford It was a dark and stormy night, which was later used by Charles Schulz in Peanuts, with Snoopy s attempts at writing a novel always starting with that line.In 1834 Bulwer Lytton published The Last Days of Pompeii, a potboiler about the days leading up the August 14, 79 AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius He has a network of characters, heroes and villains, that get into tight spots, but all goes poof when the mountain erupts and the town is buried in ash.The main characters are Glaucus, an Athenian, who is in love with the beautiful Ione But she is also loved by the Egyptian Arbaces, who turns out to a mustache twirling villain Then hear me, said Arbaces, sinking his voice into a whisper thou shalt go to thy tomb rather than to his arm What thinkest thou Arbaces will brook a rival such as this puny Greek What thinkest thou that he has watched the fruit ripen, to yield it to another Pretty fool no Thou are mine all only mine and thus thus I seize and claim thee Other key characters are the blind slave girl, Nydia, who falls in love with Glaucus, who is good to her, but in her jealousy ends up getting him sentenced to the arena to be eaten by a lion Along with him is Olinthus, the Christian, who is the bright ray of sunshine in this pagan world They regarded the Christian as the enemy of mankind the epithets they lavished upon him, of which Atheist was the most favored and frequent, may serve, perhaps, to warn us, believers of the same creed now triumphant, how we indulge the persecution of opinion Olinthus then underwent, and how we apply to those whose notions differ from our own terms at that day lavished upon the fathers of our faith Bulwer Lytton was ahead of his time on religious tolerance.The novel has a serial quality, with episodes rather than a thorough plot There is also a lot of purple prose, some of it for pages and pages, that don t seem to have much to do with anything I slowed down when actual events were taking place, but there is a ton of filler, perhaps to satisfy Bulwer Lytton s attention to his research Pompeii was the miniature of the civilization of that age Within the narrow compass of its walls was contained, as it were, a specimen of every gift which luxury offered to power In its minute but glittering shops, its tiny palaces, its baths, its forum, its theatre, its circus in the energy yet corruption, in the refinement yet the vice, of its people, you beheld a model of the whole empire Of course, this is true given that the ruins of Pompeii, which were discovered in the 1700s, was the best chance to see Roman civilization as it was, untouched for two thousand years.The last few chapters are a real page turner Arbaces has framed Glaucus for a murder he himself committed Glaucus is about to enter the arena to be eaten by a lion Will Nydia s letter to Glaucus friend, exonerating him, be read in time Of course, there s also the impending volcanic eruption, that only we know about Bulwer Lytton provides some striking details in the last few pages The lion had been kept without food for twenty four hours, and the animal had, during the whole morning, testified a singular and restless uneasiness, which the keeper had attributed to the pangs of hunger Yet is bearing seemed rather that of fear than of rage its roar was painful and distressed it hung its head snuffed the air through the bars then lay down started again and again uttered its wild and far resounding cries It s a kind of genius to shift the point of view to the lion at that point, but then we learn why the lion, once released, will ignore exposed Glaucus, an innocent man, leading the mob to cry out for justice.Then, when the volcano erupts The eyes of the crowd followed the gesture of the Egyptian, and beheld, with ineffable dismay, a vast vapor shooting from the summit of Vesuvius, in the form of a gigantic pine tree the trunk, blackness the branches, fire a fire that shifted and wavered in its hues with every moment, now fiercely luminous, now of a dull and dying red, that again blazed terrifically forth with intolerable glare Bulwer Lytton will then go on to the obvious those engaged in looting and larceny will end up buried in ash, alongside the good you can t take it with you A few will escape to the sea But he sums up the notion of time nicely here Nearly Seventeen Centuries had rolled away when the City of Pompeii was disinterred from its silent tomb, all vivid with undimmed hues its walls fresh as if painted yesterday not a hue faded on the rich mosaic of its floors in its forum the half finished columns as left by the workman s hand in its gardens the sacrificial tripod in its halls the chest of treasure in its baths the strigil in its theaters the counter of admission in its saloons the furniture and the lamp in its triclinia the fragments of the last feast in its cubicula the perfumes and the rouge of faded beauty and everywhere the bones and skeletons of those who once moved the the springs of that minute yet gorgeous machine of luxury and of life

  5. Masanobu Masanobu says:

    This was just an adventure book with a historical setting I think it had no blatant historical mistakes I don t know much about Rome or Pompeii , and it was entertaining enough, but it didn t have me hooked, as I expected I also expecteddrama from the Vesubius eruption, but it had just a mild effect on the main characters lives.What made me give this book just two stars was 1 Flat characters Good ones were really good ones Bad ones were evil Good ones win without much effort and ju This was just an adventure book with a historical setting I think it had no blatant historical mistakes I don t know much about Rome or Pompeii , and it was entertaining enough, but it didn t have me hooked, as I expected I also expecteddrama from the Vesubius eruption, but it had just a mild effect on the main characters lives.What made me give this book just two stars was 1 Flat characters Good ones were really good ones Bad ones were evil Good ones win without much effort and just in time and bad ones die because of God s Wrath 2 I don t agree with Christian views most of the time And this author introduced too much of them It felt like being a child scolded for not loving and appreciating Christ enough And everyone who was good was converted to the true religion as they said in the book and pagans were dead.However, it was still entertaining I need some fluff books from time to time

  6. Celia Celia says:

    When I was in the third grade, I attended St Mary s School, Downers Grove, IL Every Wednesday, we were summoned from our classroom to have this book read to us.At least I THINK it was this book That was 60 years ago, so who can be sure.It was the pastor of our church, a Catholic priest, who did the reading.It is a memory seared into my brain. at least the memory of sitting in an aluminum folding chair in the gym hearing some Vesuvius tale being read to me.When asked what book I enjoyed being When I was in the third grade, I attended St Mary s School, Downers Grove, IL Every Wednesday, we were summoned from our classroom to have this book read to us.At least I THINK it was this book That was 60 years ago, so who can be sure.It was the pastor of our church, a Catholic priest, who did the reading.It is a memory seared into my brain. at least the memory of sitting in an aluminum folding chair in the gym hearing some Vesuvius tale being read to me.When asked what book I enjoyed being read to me, this is what I remembered.I will have to read it again someday just to see if this was the one Of course, if it turns out to not be the one, I will be devastated

  7. Kim Kim says:

    The Last Days of Pompeii is a novel written by the baron Edward Bulwer Lytton in 1834 It shouldn t surprise you to know that the novel is about the destruction of Pompeii by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D 79, better known as a really, really long time ago The novel was inspired by the painting The Last Day of Pompeii by the Russian painter Karl Briullov, which Bulwer Lytton had seen in Milan I m going to look that up in a few minutes When I looked up the author I found that his entiThe Last Days of Pompeii is a novel written by the baron Edward Bulwer Lytton in 1834 It shouldn t surprise you to know that the novel is about the destruction of Pompeii by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D 79, better known as a really, really long time ago The novel was inspired by the painting The Last Day of Pompeii by the Russian painter Karl Briullov, which Bulwer Lytton had seen in Milan I m going to look that up in a few minutes When I looked up the author I found that his entire name was Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Lytton I wonder how long it took him to learn all that when he was little and to remember all that when he was older I don t have the strength to type all that or the patience so I m just calling him Bulwer Lytton at best I also found thisIn August 1827, against his mother s wishes, he married Rosina Doyle Wheeler, a famous Irish beauty When they married his mother withdrew his allowance and he was forced to work for a living They had two children, Lady Emily Elizabeth Bulwer Lytton 1828 1848 , and Edward Robert Lytton Bulwer Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton 1831 1891 who became Governor General and Viceroy of British India 1876 1880.His writing and political work strained their marriage while his infidelity embittered Rosina in 1833 they separated acrimoniously and in 1836 the separation became legal Three years later, Rosina published Cheveley, or the Man of Honour 1839 , a near libellous fiction bitterly satirising her husband s alleged hypocrisy.In June 1858, when her husband was standing as parliamentary candidate for Hertfordshire, she indignantly denounced him at the hustings He retaliated by threatening her publishers, withholding her allowance, and denying access to the children Finally he had her committed to a mental asylum But, after a public outcry she was released a few weeks later This incident was chronicled in her memoir,A Blighted Life 1880 For years she continued her attacks upon her husband s character I guess he should have listened to his mother When he wasn t fighting with his wife he was involved in politics spending too many years in my opinion anyway in Parliament He was elected member for St Ives in Cornwall in 1831, after which he was returned for Lincoln in 1832, and sat in Parliament for that city for nine years Lord Melbourne, the Prime Minister at the time, offered him a lordship of the admiralty, but he declined saying it was likely to interfere with his activity as an author I m not sure how that would interfere with his writing, but it doesn t really matter because that comment finally gets me to his writing, and he did a lot of writing He wrote poems and plays, mystery, historical fiction, science fiction, all kinds of things The book that made him famous was Pelham which I ve never read and I m supposed to be talking aboutThe Last Days of Pompeiiso I will.I was wondering if the first line would be as memorable as the first line of his 1830 novel Paul CliffordIt was a dark and stormy night the rain fell in torrents So I got to the first page and read thisHO, Diomed, well met Do you sup with Glaucus to night said a young man of small stature, who wore his tunic in those loose and effeminate folds which proved him to be a gentleman and a coxcomb Somehow I get the feeling it just isn t quite as well known I really liked this book, even knowing the ending long before I even opened the book, I still really liked the book Of course knowing the ending might have helped, I didn t have to worry about being surprised on the last page by having the bad guy kill the hero or some such thing in this book I already knew where the main character would be at the end of the book Him and everyone else But before the big explosion we have lots of people in the story after all it is a city of about 11,000 people I think, although not all 11,000 get mentioned in the book, except perhaps when they are all in the amphitheatre excited to see people kill each other, those who aren t doing the killing that is I had a lot of fun reading this book considering what was about to happen at any minute, it felt like any minute, although it actually took many minutes and many chapters to put an end to Pompeii and everything in it Not to mention everyone But there were so many interesting people and so many interesting things they were doing before that last chapter We have our main character one of them, who is in love with Ione Her name drove me crazy, in the book I was reading it was clearly spelled Ione, but on my e reader it was always spelled with an L at the beginning, not an I Whatever her name is our main character Glaucus is madly in love with her, and we have Nydia, a slave girl, she s in love with Glaucus, so is Julia, the daughter of Diomed Oh, he s a wealthy merchant, the one mentioned in that not famous first line Ione s brother is Apaecides, he s a priest of Isis, which he hates being can t say that I blame him seeing how these Isis priests were acting He manages to get murdered and very quickly the murderer is arrested and thrown in jail waiting to be torn up by a lion at the next gladiatorial games Now one of the things we get to do is to figure out if they are about to feed the right guy to the lion or do they have the wrong guy See, it s become a mystery, a mystery that better get cleared up quickly because they haveto worry about than a lion Oh, and we have one of the many women in love with Glaucus going to the witch who lives in the mountain in a cave at the side of it, not actually in it, she gets a potion that will make Glaucus fall in love with her It really doesn t matter if it works or not considering they are only two days or so away from everyone being dead, but you ll have to read the book to find out There s also Olinthus, he s a Christian or a Nazarene, which ever you want to call him No one likes him, they say he s an atheist for not believing in at least one of the about 100 gods they have in this town He s being fed to the wild animals too, not a lion though, he s only getting a tiger Then there is Arbaces, by far the worst person in the book This guy never does anything nice for anyone ever At one time he has three people locked up, one of them is blind, another is a priest, and he has them locked up in his house because he s just a mean, horrible person Well, there s a littleto it than that, but not much Any time the lava wants to cover this guy is alright with me Here are some of the quotes that I underlined, well I would have if I could bring myself to write in a bookDespite the habits of his life, Sallust was not devoid of many estimable qualities He would have been an active friend, a useful citizen in short, an excellent man, if he had not taken it into his head to be a philosopher On the upper tier but apart from the male spectators sat women, their gay dresses resembling some gaudy flower bed it is needless to add that they were the most talkative part of the assembly and many were the looks directed up to them, especially from the benches appropriated to the young and the unmarried men On the lower seats round the arena sat thehigh born and wealthy visitors the magistrates and those of senatorial or equestrian dignity the passages which, by corridors at the right and left, gave access to these seats, at either end of the oval arena, were also the entrances for the combatants Strong palings at these passages prevented any unwelcome eccentricity in the movements of the beasts, and confined them to their appointed prey Around the parapet which was raised above the arena, and from which the seats gradually rose, were gladiatorial inscriptions, and paintings wrought in fresco, typical of the entertainments for which the place was designed Throughout the whole building wound invisible pipes, from which, as the day advanced, cooling and fragrant showers were to be sprinkled over the spectators Still, it was an awful and imposing spectacle, with which modern times have, happily, nothing to compare a vast theatre, rising row upon row, and swarming with human beings, from fifteen to eighteen thousand in number, intent upon no fictitious representation no tragedy of the stage but the actual victory or defeat, the exultant life or the bloody death, of each and all who entered the arena Berbix raised his buckler to shield himself, and his quick eyed antagonist, suddenly lowering his weapon, pierced him through the breast Berbix reeled and fell Nobilior Nobilior shouted the populace I have lost ten sestertia, said Clodius, between his teeth Habet he has it, said Pansa, deliberately The populace, not yet hardened into cruelty, made the signal of mercy but as the attendants of the arena approached, they found the kindness came too late the heart of the Gaul had been pierced, and his eyes were set in death It was his life s blood that flowed so darkly over the sand and sawdust of the arena It is a pity it was so soon over there was little enough for one s trouble, said the widow FulviaAnd that s it, the rest of the story you should either know, or you can read the book to find out I wanted , I wanted to know who ends up with Ione and who ends up with Glaucus, and if Arbaces ever stops doing horrible things to people, for that matter does he ever let the people he has locked up in his house go free There may be one or two surprises out there, after all, does every single person die or does one or two manage to escape Does Glaucus die, Ione, Nydia What about the lion, read the book to find out, I can t remember where the lion ended up anyway I may have given the book five stars, which takes a lot, but the descriptions of houses and gardens and baths and such got a little long, and people breaking out into song or reciting poetry, not only feeling it necessary to sing or say every single verse, but the author felt the need to write down every single verse, that got a little tiring after awhile I still liked it A long, long time after Pompeii was destroyed people got around to digging it up again, the people of Pompeii must have liked painting their walls, here is some of wall art they found Happy reading

  8. Sam Sam says:

    This is an interesting read that shows what life was like for a number of the inhabitants of Pompeii in the days leading up to the eruption that made the city so infamous Lytton uses his characters to cover all the main cultures and peoples that make up this colourful city, from the Greeks represented by Glaucus and the Egyptians represented by Arbaces to the new religion of Christianity represented by Olinthus and the older religions and belief in the occult represented by the Witch T This is an interesting read that shows what life was like for a number of the inhabitants of Pompeii in the days leading up to the eruption that made the city so infamous Lytton uses his characters to cover all the main cultures and peoples that make up this colourful city, from the Greeks represented by Glaucus and the Egyptians represented by Arbaces to the new religion of Christianity represented by Olinthus and the older religions and belief in the occult represented by the Witch The only people not well represented are the Italians themselves but then again Pompeii is very much a Greek stronghold thanks to its coastal location and fertile lands The vibrancy of the people and the city is portrayed well and even though you know how it all ends there is still a sense of hope as well as a sense of dread that keeps things moving well Personally I would ve likedabout the eruption itself and how each of the main characters faired and where they ended up afterwards but this may have taken away from the feeling of finality that the book ends with so maybe its for the best

  9. Brenda Brenda says:

    Fascinated me Revealed how the people of Pompeii lived, what their daily lives were like As the author describes the volcano erupting, I felt that I was right there and could feel what the people felt I read this way before there was much information out or any movies made so it was just mind boggling to me Made me want to visit and see the ruins.

  10. Erik Graff Erik Graff says:

    I read this thing while taking Latin and belonging to the Latin Club at Maine Township South High School South in Park Ridge, Illinois Although not highly regarded as literature, I, as an early teen, liked it quite a lot except for what, even then, I felt to be a rather saccharine Christianity.

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