Camus: The Stranger ePUB ´ Camus: The PDF or

Camus: The Stranger (Landmarks of World Literature (New)STUDY GUIDE ➫ Camus: The Stranger (Landmarks of World Literature (New)STUDY GUIDE Read ➳ Author Patrick McCarthy – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Patrick McCarthy analyzes The Stranger, one of the vital texts of existentialism and twentieth century literature, in the context of French and French Algerian history and culture McCarthy examines ho Patrick McCarthy analyzes The Stranger, one of the vital texts of existentialism and twentieth century literature, in the context of French and French Algerian history and culture McCarthy examines how the work undermines traditional concepts of fiction and explores parallels and contrasts between Camus Camus: The PDF or s work and that of Jean Paul Sartre Providing students with a useful companion to The Stranger, this second edition features a revised guide to further reading and a new chapter on Camus and the Algerian War First Edition HbFirst Edition Pb.


10 thoughts on “Camus: The Stranger (Landmarks of World Literature (New)STUDY GUIDE

  1. Matthew W Matthew W says:

    Not a bad collection of essays analyzing The Stranger Unlike most Marxist intellectual types, Albert Camus was not a failed bourgeois like the Messiah himself Karl Marx , but someone from the actual working class who experienced much pain throughout his life his death in a car wreck being the crowning moment of his life of tragedy Camus rejected the Marxism violence promoted by Jean Paul Sartre the fellow that was influenced by that evil Nazi Martin Heidegger, often considered the greates Not a bad collection of essays analyzing The Stranger Unlike most Marxist intellectual types, Albert Camus was not a failed bourgeois like the Messiah himself Karl Marx , but someone from the actual working class who experienced much pain throughout his life his death in a car wreck being the crowning moment of his life of tragedy Camus rejected the Marxism violence promoted by Jean Paul Sartre the fellow that was influenced by that evil Nazi Martin Heidegger, often considered the greatest philosopher of the last century and seemed at odds with his fellow intellectual proletarians The book essentially does a good job clarifying the real life political views of Albert Camus in context with The Stranger I recommend reading this book for it does fill in a couple holes as to the meaning of certain aspects of the novel


  2. Marti Martinson Marti Martinson says:

    Obviously well researched, this shed unfiltered light on Camus as well as the political and social landscapes of his time He appears to have had manystruggles than I ever imagined, but, despite exposing warts and all , the author still presents a man of integrity who is true to his contradictions Damn, I love that phrase.The author is quite conversant with absurdism and existentialism, so the full meanings and implications of Camus writings were explained..and will be forgotten.Th Obviously well researched, this shed unfiltered light on Camus as well as the political and social landscapes of his time He appears to have had manystruggles than I ever imagined, but, despite exposing warts and all , the author still presents a man of integrity who is true to his contradictions Damn, I love that phrase.The author is quite conversant with absurdism and existentialism, so the full meanings and implications of Camus writings were explained..and will be forgotten.The passage was stupendous Camus, who was an excellent theologian, repeats that, whereas innocence is a unity, guilt is a form of division which leaves man without any core of character, makes him subservient to others, and forces him to realize that he is an other to himself.Learning that Camus could also hold a grudge Priceless


  3. Stuart Stuart says:

    Mr McCarthy s biography of Camus employs a particular irony well suited to his subject Camus the saint, Camus the resistance leader, Camus the existentialist and Camus the committed leftist are all debunked, leaving in their place something muchcompelling and likeable Camus the human.Mr McCarthy s work is almostof a sourcebook than a biography, containing lengthy discourses on the colonial history of Algeria and the war for Algerian Independence, interwar literary criticism, the Mr McCarthy s biography of Camus employs a particular irony well suited to his subject Camus the saint, Camus the resistance leader, Camus the existentialist and Camus the committed leftist are all debunked, leaving in their place something muchcompelling and likeable Camus the human.Mr McCarthy s work is almostof a sourcebook than a biography, containing lengthy discourses on the colonial history of Algeria and the war for Algerian Independence, interwar literary criticism, the interminable details of continental leftist politics, and French theater in addition to the typical places, times and motives of the average biography.Camus is presented quite nearly as one of his protagonists, a man of passion without conviction, whose lust for action is stymied by a complete and existential disaffection Personally heroic but geopolitically tragic he was very late to the French resistance and his views on French Algeria are rightfully denounced , he presaged but could not formulate, alas a left libertarianism opposed to both western capitalism and Stalinist totalitarianism Had he hadtime perhaps he could have seen beyond the rim of his own experiences and written truly political texts later in life.One of the biggest revelations of this biography is that Camus writing is not political or philosophical but rather moral, nearly religious As a disaffected teen with no real entry point into leftist politics or critical theory Camus was an important first step His central premises that knowledge is partial, that the human condition and society, as an extension of that condition is absurd, and that the universe is empty and uncaring are necessary antecedents to the development of critical inquiry and necessary antidotes to a reactionary, religious upbringing Perhaps we should reframe Camus as one of the few writers who truly lived what he wrote his politics, his art, and his life were all gloriously incomplete, with vast silences filling the spaces he could not figure out how to bridge


  4. Larry Bernstein Larry Bernstein says:

    Work complements Alice Kaplan s Biography of The StrangerAn excellent literary criticism of Camus The Stranger, I was impressed by the breadth of the analysis Most important it was a fun read Will need to readby this author.


  5. David David says:

    A few years before I read the biography of Camus, I had lived in Port aux Poules, Algeria, along the coast very near to Arzew and Oran I came to know the remnants of the pied noirs still in Algeria and how they had been expelled, not unjustly so perhaps So when I learned that Camus was of these people I read the story of his life, having considered already that his L etranger was one of the best books I had ever read, to learn how he had become an existentialist his word I believe Algeria p A few years before I read the biography of Camus, I had lived in Port aux Poules, Algeria, along the coast very near to Arzew and Oran I came to know the remnants of the pied noirs still in Algeria and how they had been expelled, not unjustly so perhaps So when I learned that Camus was of these people I read the story of his life, having considered already that his L etranger was one of the best books I had ever read, to learn how he had become an existentialist his word I believe Algeria provides that backdrop where one who does not come from its native soil, can exist there only as an existentialist But growing up there you wouldn t feel that You re just a foreigner in a foreign land, which is an existentialist state very much like wartime, you later find out, which is what Camus discovered as a Resistance leader under Nazi occupation This book was a good introduction to Existentialism


  6. Alice Alice says:

    This book appealed greatly to my 17 year old nihilistic self There is no meaning but that which we can hear, touch, see, smell, or taste The protagonist can be understood as a mirror to the reader, as he himself expresses very few emotions, and is mostly described in terms of physical sensations, reinforcing the message of the novel.


  7. Matilda Lou Matilda Lou says:

    i realize this is the study guide i realize however, i liked the book it brings a sense of distance and fury the character can only feel the moment and he can t explain what that moment is he gets damned for it shit.


  8. Outmind Outmind says:

    4.5 5Actually, i ve read this before, but thought i hadn t finished it Turns out i did In any case, an amusing work.


  9. Amy P. Amy P. says:

    Absurd.


  10. Manda Manda says:

    This is an amazing book One of my favorites


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